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Globe photos of the month, June 2015

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month including an attempt to break a record for the “most arm-linked people standing up simultaneously,” the beginning of summer, the Old Colony Unity Day, and Boston Pride Week.-- By Lloyd Young (28 photos total)

Great Barrier Reef at risk

UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 1,200 miles off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world’s largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef’s outlook was “poor”.-- By Reuters (19 photos total)

Same-sex marriage legalized in US

The US Supreme Court made a historic decision today in a 5-4 ruling establishing same-sex marriage across all 50 states, ending two decades of litigation.-- By Lloyd Young (31 photos total)

European Games 2015

The first European Games are nearing their conclusion with this Sunday’s closing ceremonies in Baku, Azerbaijan. More than 6,000 athletes from European Olympic nations have been competing in 20 sports, mainly traditional, but also including beach volleyball, martial arts such as karate and Sambo, and 3x3 basketball.-- By Lloyd Young (26 photos total)

International Day of Yoga

The first International Day of Yoga was held on June 21 and India set a record for the largest yoga demonstration in a single venue. Many other countries participated in the holiday recognized by the United Nations.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (20 photos total)

Shooting at Charleston church

Nine people were killed Wednesday night when authorities say Dylan Storm Roof, 21, fired upon a prayer meeting inside the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. Roof was captured on Thursday after an intense manhunt.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (32 photos total)

Children of the Moon

Alabaster-skinned people born on a sun-scorched group of islands off Panama’s Caribbean coast are venerated as “Children of the Moon”. Albinos make up between 5 and 10 percent of the roughly 80,000 indigenous Gunas who live on the mainland of the Guna Yala region and its islands. With their sensitive skin and eyes, young Guna albinos must be shuttled to and from school, avoiding the baking heat, while they watch their friends play in the streets. International Albinism Awareness Day was June 13th.-- By Reuters (16 photos total)

Commencement ceremonies 2015

It’s the time of the year for many to commemorate their achievements and to mark moving on to the next step in their lives. Around the world, commencements big and small were photographed depicting the proud graduates and supporters.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (27 photos total)

Women’s World Cup 2015

The Women’s World Cup is underway across Canada with 24 nations vying to make the title game on July 5. The finalists from 2011, Japan and the United States, both won in their opening round games.-- By Lloyd Young (23 photos total)

Volcanic activity 2015

A look at volcanoes around the world that have been threatening in the past few months. From Japan to Chile, eruptions occurred in dramatic fashion, forcing many evacuations.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (29 photos total)

Fruits of Wrath

Fruit pickers in the Baja California peninsula of Mexico, railing against a life of grinding poverty, have blocked roads, staged marches and held meetings with lawmakers since March as frustration over working conditions boiled over. One labourer in San Quintin, south of the border town of Tijuana, sleeps with his family on the bare earth in a tiny wooden shack on scrubland. He said after picking between 242 lbs and 440 lbs of strawberries a day he earns from $56 to $79 a week. Strawberries fetched $2.36 a pound on average in the United States in 2013.-- By Reuters (16 photos total)

Chinese cruise liner’s sinking

The recovery effort continued today for victims of the cruise ship that capsized on the Yangtze River in China earlier this week during a storm. Officials have said some 420 people remain missing from the cruise liner, which was on an 11-day trip. (19 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, May 2015

Here’s a look at just some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month including the annual Duckling Day Parade, North Atlantic right whales feeding in the waters off Duxbury Beach, college commencements, and the Boston Marathon bombing verdict. (31 photos total)

Daily Life: May 2015

For daily life photos in May, a look at how photographers use the many textures of life to make compelling images. Light, colors and repetition of forms often create patterns that are perfectly captured in a still image. Capturing moments of life happening among these templates is what makes photography so fascinating.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (32 photos total)

Texas flooding

Major rainfall over the past few days has caused severe flooding and property damage in parts of Texas. Houston received more than 10 inches of rain overnight, which closed highways, shut schools, and suspended public transportation. Authorities have reported 11 people killed from the recent storms that hit both Texas and Oklahoma with others still missing.-- By Lloyd Young (30 photos total)

Oil spill in California

A section of pipeline off Refugio State Beach in California ruptured on Tuesday, spilling about 105,000 gallons of crude oil. Nine miles of the scenic coast are affected and the governor declared a state of emergency. Crews have been cleaning the habitat and helping the wildlife caught in the oil slick all week.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (31 photos total)

Cities in the clouds

Here is a selection of images the Reuters news agency pulled from its files showing cities shrouded in weather that make them appear to be living among the clouds.-- By Lloyd Young (12 photos total)

Turmoil in Burundi

Since Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza announced that he was seeking a third term, protests and violence erupted. The political crisis brought on last week’s attempted coup, and has forced many to flee the country to seek refuge.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (29 photos total)

Living with creatures

Photographers have documented the relationships between humans and animals in countless ways. Some photos depict how animals depend on us and others show how we rely on animals. The ways in which we share this world and interact with other living things is endless and sometimes very unique.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (38 photos total)

Amtrak derailment

Authorities continue to investigate the scene of a fatal train derailment on a route between Washington and New York last night. The death toll stood at seven Wednesday afternoon with more than 200 injured from the accident that occurred in Philadelphia at a notorious curve on the line.-- By Lloyd Young (19 photos total)

Tornadoes rip through US

Strong spring storms producing multiple tornadoes and flooding have hit the United States over the last week. In Texas, a twister struck the town of Van last night damaging 30 percent of the community and killing two, according to authorities.-- By Lloyd Young (19 photos total)

Venice Biennale 2015

The prestigious Venice Biennale kicks off this weekend, exhibiting contemporary artists from 89 countries around the world for the 56th year. The city of Venice will be buzzing with art aficionados and enthusiasts viewing throughout the Arsenal, pavilions and locations throughout the historic city.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (32 photos total)

Berlin battleground- 70 years later

Some 70 years after the Battle for Berlin, instrumental in the end of World War II, Reuters photographer Fabrizio Bensch unearthed pictures by Red Army photographer Georgiy Samsonov that depicted his portrayal of a city laid siege. Bensch bought an exactly equivalent FED camera, a Soviet copy of the German-made Leica II, and chose to use black and white film to capture images of the same locations he discovered in modern-day Berlin.-- By Reuters (13 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, April 2015

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month including celebrating Easter, the Boston Marathon, and opening day at Fenway Park.-- By Lloyd Young (32 photos total)

Unrest in Baltimore

Violence filled the streets of Baltimore on Monday following the funeral of Freddie Gray, who died from injuries suffered while in police custody. The National Guard was activated and a curfew was imposed for the following days. Citizens gathered to clean up the damage and protest after the rioting, as hope for resolution of the crisis continues.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (40 photos total)

Earthquake devastates Nepal

The recovery and rescue effort continued today as the death toll passed 4,000 and reportedly will climb higher from a devastating 7.8-magnitude earthquake that hit near Kathmandu on April 25. Nepal’s worst earthquake in 80 years destroyed countless buildings and infrastructure as people struggled to meet basic human needs in the quake’s aftermath.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel and Lloyd Young (35 photos total)

Remembering Armenia’s losses

People around the world this week remembered the estimated 1.5 million Armenians killed over a two-year period by the Ottoman Empire 100 years ago. Along with the memorials, protests were held pointing out that the United States and Turkey governments have not yet formally recognized the mass killings as genocide. (26 photos total)

Crisis in the Mediterranean

Hundreds of migrants have perished trying to make the trek through the Mediterranean Sea to Europe this year. Just days ago, over 700 hundred are feared dead in a sunken boat disaster off the coast of Libya. Near the Greek Island of the Rhodes, rescued efforts continued, as boats carrying migrants crashed into rocks. With such a huge loss of life, European leaders are forced to respond to this humanitarian crisis as emergency meetings are planned this week.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (27 photos total)

The 2015 Boston Marathon

The running of the world-class Boston Marathon filled the cold and wet streets of the city for the 119th time today. 2013 men’s winner Lelisa Desisa was victorious again this year, two years after he returned his medal to the city in a sign of solidarity after the tragic bombings.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (27 photos total)

Coachella 2015

Music fans gathered to hear a wide variety of musical styles at this year’s Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, held over two weekends in Indio, Calif. More than 100 acts were on the bill of the sold-out event.-- By Lloyd Young (27 photos total)

Cherry blossoms 2015

From Japan to Washington, D.C. people gather to relish the beauty of the blooming cherry tree. Highly aniticpated and heavily photographed, the blossoms are celebrated by many.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (28 photos total)

Opening Day at Fenway Park 2015

With sunny skies and mild temperatures the Red Sox kicked off Opening Day at Fenway Park against the Washington Nationals. Coming off a last place finish in the AL East, the Sox are looking for a turnaround year.-- By Lloyd Young (29 photos total)

Memories of Abraham Lincoln

On April 15 the United States commemorates the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. Events will include the re-enactment of his funeral in Springfield, IL, as well as talks and plays at Ford’s Theatre in Washington D.C., where Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth shot him in 1865. Lincoln, who kept the Union together in the American Civil War and helped secure the end of slavery, has enduring appeal both in the United States and worldwide.-- By Reuters (23 photos total)

Record-breaking drought in California

The drought in California last week hit historic proportions when California Governor Jerry Brown ordered cities and towns to cut water use by 25 percent in an unprecedented mandate. The Sierra Nevada mountains recorded the lowest amount of snow ever, leading to the mandatory water restrictions. Residents will need to change their daily habits which may also alter the look of their landscape.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (29 photos total)

Attack in Kenya

In the deadliest attack in Kenya since 1998, 147 people were killed in a horrifying rampage at Garissa University. On the day after, grieving familes waited for the remains of the victims, as many Kenyans denounced the terror.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (21 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, March 2015

Here’s a look at just some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month including a local group’s trip to Selma, Ala., the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in South Boston, and the high school state basketball and hockey championships.-- By Lloyd Young (30 photos total)

Radioactive Fukushima

Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo’s assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents’ backyards.-- By Reuters (16 photos total)

Crisis in Yemen

Since the horrific attack on Shi’ite mosques last week, Yemen has been tumbling into chaos. Militants of the Islamic State claimed responsibility, intensifying conflict with the rebel Houthi group that continues to gain control of parts of the country. Saudia Arabia has conducted airstrikes to try to stop the advance, and ground troops could also be sent from other countries. NOTE: Graphic content-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (32 photos total)

Mascots bring the spirit

With the NCAA March Madness Tournament underway, the mascots are out in force to bring good luck to their teams. Here are some of them, and other mascots representing their team or organization.-- By Lloyd Young (27 photos total)

Ceremony fit for a king

Thousands of people lined the streets of Leicester, England, Sunday to view the coffin of King Richard III as it made its way to Leicester Cathedral for three days of public viewing before his remains are reinterred during a service attended by members of the royal family. The skeletal remains of the king were discovered in 2012 under a parking lot some 500 years after he was killed during the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.-- By Lloyd Young (23 photos total)

Spring scenes

Spring has arrived in the Northern Hemisphere. The vernal equinox is anticipated by many looking forward to warmer temperatures and a welcoming rebirth. In some areas of the world, the signs are more apparent. This year, the first day of spring held the distinction of coinciding with a solar eclipse.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (27 photos total)

Colors in the Sky

With a severe solar storm raging, the Northern Lights, or aurora borealis, could be seen from the island of Nantucket this week. The phenomenon, usually visible only much farther north, takes place when gaseous particles in the Earth’s atmosphere collide with charged particles released from the sun.-- By Lloyd Young (12 photos total)

Seeing white: A historic winter

With an impressive 108.6 inches of snow, Boston made history with its snowiest winter on record. Here is a look at how photographers captured the striking ways that this massive amount of snow changed the landscape in the region for months. (30 photos total)

Children of war

The United Nations children’s agency reported this week that 14 million children in Syria and Iraq are in crisis due to war. The number of children needing aid has greatly increased from the previous year and there are fears that living with the severe violence will permanently scar the young generation. Here is a look at recent photos depicting the lives of children during this conflict.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (27 photos total)

Hitting the Slopes

It seems, with the current snowpack in New England, skiers will be able to “Arc ‘em or park ‘em” until May this year. Here’s a look at some of those competing in or enjoying the winter sport since the beginning of the year.-- By Lloyd Young (28 photos total)

Journey to Selma

A contingent from Boston, including students from the University of Massachusetts Boston, made their way to Selma, Ala., on a 25-hour bus ride to retrace the steps of those who marched over the Edmund Pettus Bridge 50 years ago for civil rights with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Globe photographer Jessica Rinaldi accompanied them on their journey to document their experience.-- By Lloyd Young (23 photos total)

Holi Celebrations 2015

Holi is a festival that marks events in Hindu mythology and provides photographers with a colorful visual feast. It celebrates the beginning of spring, and falls on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna, which was on March 6 this year. It is a joyous ritual when intense colors, light, emotion, and energy combine in a surreal vision of spirituality.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (25 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, February 2015

Documenting one family’s home birth experience

Home births aren’t for everyone. But for Ashley Bennett, having her second child at home in Medford was an opportunity to be encouraged and supported at a time when she, and many women, feel at their most vulnerable. The birth plan gave Ashleyand her husband, Mike, an array of delivery options, but, as always when it comes to birth, circumstances were unpredictable. The night Ashley went into labor, their toddler, Marin, came down with a fever. And Ashley’s dreams of a water birth — in a giant portable tub — dried up when the new addition to the family, Isaac Douglas Bennett, arrived before the tub was filled. Besides doula Catherine McKeown-Lindsey and midwives Tara Kenny and Audra Karp, the Bennetts allowed Globe photographer Jessica Rinaldi to witness the family’s private moments. (14 photos total)

Roll out the barrels

Saudi Arabia’s oil exports have risen in February in response to stronger demand from customers. As OPEC’s top producer battles for market share Reuters photographers around the globe have been photographing oil barrels to document how they are utilized once the fuel has been used.-- By Reuters (24 photos total)
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