You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Studies shed light on Alzheimer’s spread

NEW YORK - Alzheimer’s disease seems to spread like an infection from brain cell to brain cell, two new studies find. But instead of viruses or bacteria, what is being spread is a distorted protein known as tau.

The finding answers a longstanding question and has immediate implications for developing treatments, researchers said. And, they said, they suspect that other degenerative brain diseases, like Parkinson’s, may spread in the brain in a similar way.

Continue reading below

Researchers have long known that dying, tau-filled cells first emerge in an area of the brain where memories are made and stored. The disease then slowly moves outward to larger areas that involve remembering and reasoning.

But for more than a quarter century they have been unable to decide between two explanations. The spread may mean that the disease is transmitted from neuron to neuron, perhaps along the paths nerve cells use to communicate with one another. Or it could simply mean that some brain areas are more resilient than others and so resist the disease longer.

The studies provide an answer. And they indicate it may be possible to bring a patient’s Alzheimer’s disease to a halt early in its course by preventing cell-to-cell transmission.

The studies, done independently by researchers at Columbia and Harvard universities, involved genetically engineered mice that could make abnormal human tau proteins, but predominantly in the entorhinal cortex, a sliver of tissue behind the ears, toward the middle of the brain, where cells first start dying in Alzheimer’s disease.

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

You have reached the limit of 5 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.