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Days after Isaac, thousands still in the dark

Isaac flooding

AP

Natachia Riley talked on the phone outside her mother’s house in Ironton, La., which was flooded by Isaac.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tens of thousands of customers remained in the dark Monday in Louisiana and Mississippi, days after Isaac inundated the Gulf Coast with a deluge that still has some low-lying areas under water.

Most of those were in Louisiana, where utilities reported more than 100,000 people without power as of Monday morning. Thousands also were without power in Mississippi and Arkansas.

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Thousands of evacuees remained at shelters or bunked with friends or relatives.

‘‘My family is split up,’’ said Angela Serpas, from severely flooded Braithwaite in Plaquemines Parish. Serpas and her daughter were staying with her in-laws while her husband and son were staying in Belle Chasse, a suburban area of the parish.

‘‘This is the second time we’ve lost our home. We lost it in Katrina,’’ she said.

Meanwhile, inspectors from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are out trying to get a handle on losses. Residents can apply for grants to get help with home repairs and temporary housing, among other expenses.

President Barack Obama was to visit Louisiana on Monday, a day ahead of the Democratic National Convention. He will meet with local officials, tour storm damage, and view response and recovery efforts before addressing reporters at Saint John the Baptist Parish, the White House said. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney visited the state Friday. Obama’s Homeland Security Secretary, Janet Napolitano, visited Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Slidell, La., on Sunday.

‘‘We are part of a team to make sure Hurricane Isaac is put to rest as soon as we can for all those affected,’’ Napolitano said. ‘‘In the meantime, please know all of us are thinking about those in Louisiana who are without their homes or without their businesses.’’

AP

Days after Isaac hit the Gulf Coast, some areas are still flooded.

At least seven people were killed in the storm in the US — five in Louisiana and two in Mississippi.

More than 2,800 people were registered at various state, local and Red Cross shelters in Louisiana, down from around 4,000 earlier. State officials were uncertain how many people would eventually need longer-term temporary housing. Kevin Davis, head of the state’s emergency office, said that housing would likely include hotels at first, then rental homes as close as possible to their damaged property.

Progress was evident in many places, though lingering flooding remained a problem in low-lying areas.

Crews in the town of Lafitte intentionally breached a levee Sunday night in an effort to help flooding there subside, Jefferson Parish Councilman Chris Roberts told The Times-Picayune.

Much of Plaquemines Parish, a vulnerable finger of land that juts into the Gulf of Mexico, remained under as much as 5 feet of water, Parish President Billy Nungesser said. The Category 1 hurricane walloped the parish, and for many, the damage was worse than that from Katrina in 2005.

‘‘I’ve never seen water come up this quick this fast,’’ he said.

Nungesser said there were reports that cattle in the largely rural parish took refuge on porches. In one instance, cattle broke through a window and lumbered onto furniture to stay above water.

Controlled breaches of one overtopped levee and additional pumps are being used to get rid of the water.

Entergy, which provides power to most of the people who lost it, was under fire over the weekend from local government officials for what they said was a slow pace of restoration. Jefferson Parish President John Young said widespread outages were hampering businesses’ recovery from the storm and he would ask the state Public Service Commission to investigate.

Entergy spokesman Chanel Lagarde noted that Isaac had lingered over the state after Tuesday’s landfall and said Friday was the first day the corporation could get restoration efforts into high gear.

‘‘We are working hard. We do have a good plan and we’re going about it in an approach that we think is going to be effective,’’ Lagarde said.

___

Burdeau reported from Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Slidell, La.

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