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Conrail studied problems day before N.J. crash

PAULSBORO, N.J. — Conrail crews studied reported signal problems at a New Jersey railroad bridge the day before a train derailment that caused a toxic chemical leak, federal investigators said Sunday.

More than 100 people remained out of their homes while crews hoped to start removing the hazardous material, vinyl chloride, from a ruptured tanker.

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The National Transportation Safety Board cannot examine the scene until the chemicals are removed. But the agency has begun reviewing records with a focus on the signal problems reported recently and a 2009 train derailment on the same bridge.

Conrail regularly moves tons of hazardous material over the low bridge, which was originally built in 1873. The bridge straddles Mantua Creek, a tributary near the Delaware River in the industrial town of Paulsboro.

The bridge operates like a garden fence, with a section that swings sideways to open for boat traffic, then closes and locks for freight trains.

The NTSB expects to focus its probe on that locking mechanism along with the signal devices, which are triggered by sensors on the bridge, not by dispatchers.

‘‘This is a very complex [bridge] operation,’’ Hersman said at a news conference Sunday. ‘‘There is a lot of tonnage that goes over this bridge and a lot of hazardous materials.’’

Conrail crews in recent days and weeks had been reporting problems with the signal, and the rail company had been looking into the problem only the day before, she said.

The veteran two-person crew was familiar with the route and had run it on the three previous nights. They had started their shift at 3 a.m. Friday and were surprised to get a yellow signal when they approached the bridge at about 7 a.m.

They used a keypad device, similar to a garage door opener, to try to get a green light, but were unsuccessful. The pair stopped the train for several minutes, examined the tracks, and then got permission from a dispatcher to proceed, Hersman said.

The two locomotives and five cars made it across before the crew looked back to see the bridge ‘‘collapse’’ and a pileup of cars in the creek. The one that ruptured had been damaged by another tanker, Hersman said.

Recordings of various data so far support the crew’s account, investigators said.

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