You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Marine: Improper procedures used in Manning case

FORT MEADE, Md. — The Marine Corps’ top correctional administrator said Wednesday that brig officials at Quantico, Va., used improper procedures to recommend that an Army private charged with giving US secrets to the WikiLeaks website be held in maximum custody.

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Abel Galaviz testified at a pretrial hearing at Fort Meade to determine whether the nine months that Private First Class Bradley Manning spent in the brig amounted to illegal punishment, possibly warranting a dismissal of the case.

Continue reading below

Galaviz said the board used an unapproved form to convey its recommendations to the brig commander.

The testimony was the strongest evidence the defense has produced to counter the government’s claim that the confinement conditions were proper.

Nevertheless, Galaviz concluded that the brig commander, Chief Warrant Officer 4 James Averhart, was justified in keeping Manning in maximum custody.

Earlier Wednesday, a former supervisor of the brig denied Wednesday that he was making light of Manning’s homosexuality when he referred to the soldier’s underwear as ‘‘panties’’ in a memo. Marine Corps Master Sergeant Brian Papakie testified as a prosecution witness on the seventh day of the pretrial hearing.

The military contends Manning had to be confined to his 8-by-6-foot cell at least 23 hours a day, sometimes without clothing, to prevent him from hurting or killing himself during his confinement from July 2010 to April 2011.

Under questioning by defense lawyer David Coombs, Papakie said he uses the word “panties” interchangeably with ‘‘skivvies’’ and ‘‘underwear’’ when discussing men’s undershorts.

‘‘I’ve always used the phrase, ‘Don’t get my panties in a bunch,’ which is what I tell the staff all the time,’’ he said.

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.