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Rescuers free woman wedged between 2 buildings for about four hours

 The Portland Fire Department’s Urban Search and Rescue unit had been trained for similar situations. They made cuts and used a soapy lubricant to execute the rescue.

Brent Wojahn/The Oregonian

The Portland Fire Department’s Urban Search and Rescue unit had been trained for similar situations. They made cuts and used a soapy lubricant to execute the rescue.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Firefighters cut a hole through concrete and used an air bag and a soapy lubricant to free a woman who fell and became stuck in a narrow opening between two buildings Wednesday morning.

The woman spent about four hours in a space 8 to 10 inches wide. News shows broadcast footage of the rescue and showed the woman emerging at about 7:30 a.m.

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The woman raised her face, clenched her fists, and shouted, “Oh, my God.”

Firefighters had not gotten a clear explanation for how the woman got into the predicament. Lieutenant Rich Chatman of the Portland Fire Department said she had been seen smoking or walking on the roof before she fell about 10 to 12 feet.

The Oregon woman was wedged about four feet above the ground before rescuers installed braces to support her. Firefighters turned on a portable heater to keep her warm in near-freezing temperatures while they dropped an air bag into the opening to slightly spread the walls.

“She was in good spirits,” Chatman said. “We just tried to reassure her . . . we weren’t going home without her.”

After rescuers cut a window-size opening in the concrete wall, Chatman climbed in to help apply the soapy substance. The woman then wiggled toward the hole as the rescue team tugged on her.

“It was so tight, it wasn’t until the last foot that she could actually see me,” Chatman said. “She had that look in her eye that she was coming out no matter what.”

She was taken to the Oregon Health & Science University hospital and appeared to be in good health, fire Lieutenant Damon Simmons said. Because she is a patient, the department will not release her name unless she gives consent.

The department’s Urban Search and Rescue unit who extricated the woman train for situations such as building collapses and none of the tactics used Wednesday were improvised, Simmons said.

“They’re ready for when the big earthquake hits,” he said.

“She was just so relieved,” Chatman said. “She’d been there for over three hours against two cold slabs.”

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