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President Obama backs gays in Boy Scouts

WASHINGTON — President Obama said Sunday that gays should be allowed in the Boy Scouts and women should be allowed in military combat roles, weighing in on two storied American institutions facing proposals to end long-held exclusions.

The president’s comments in a pre-Super Bowl interview on CBS come ahead of this week’s meeting of the Boy Scouts’ national executive board. A proposal to open up the Scouts’ membership to gays is expected to be discussed and possibly voted on at the gathering in Texas.

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The Boy Scouts emphatically reaffirmed the no-gays policy just seven months ago but said last week they were considering changing the stance. Instead of mandatory exclusion of gays, the different religious and civic groups that sponsor Scout units would be able to decide for themselves how to address the issue — either maintaining the exclusion or opening up their membership.

The White House said in a statement in August that Obama opposed the gay ban. Obama, like presidents for the last century, serves as honorary president of the group. The president’s comment Sunday was his first since the group said it was considering a policy change.

‘‘My attitude is that gays and lesbians should have access and opportunity the same way everybody else does in every institution and walk of life,’’ Obama said. ‘‘The Scouts are a great institution that are promoting young people and exposing them to opportunities and leadership that will serve people for the rest of their lives. And I think nobody should be barred from that.’’

Obama also had previously issued a statement supporting the Pentagon’s decision last month to open up front-line combat jobs to women, but the interview with CBS’s Scott Pelley included his first publicly spoken comments on the matter since the announcement. He said women are already serving in combat ‘‘as a practical matter.’’

‘‘When they’re in theater in places like Iraq and Afghanistan, they are vulnerable,’’ he said. ‘‘They are wounded, and they’ve been killed. And they have carried out their jobs with extraordinary patriotism and distinction.’’

The policy change overturns a 1994 rule prohibiting women from being assigned to smaller ground combat units.

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