You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Bratton has eye on NYC police job

PURCHASE, N.Y. — Former New York City police commissioner William Bratton said Wednesday that he would consider returning to the job and has met with several candidates for mayor.

‘‘I’d be lying if I said it would not be of interest,’’ Bratton said. ‘‘I think I have more to contribute, more ideas, and I like being in a position to make a difference.’’

Continue reading below

Bratton, 65, was commissioner from 1994 to 1996 under Mayor Rudy Giuliani. He spoke to reporters after delivering the keynote speech at a symposium on school safety at Purchase College.

Bratton said he has met with mayoral candidates including former comptroller Bill Thompson and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, both Democrats, and Republican publisher Tom Allon.

He said those discussions were about police matters such as the size of the department and the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk program, and did not include specific offers to come back as commissioner.

‘‘I keep all my options open,’’ he said. ‘‘Who knows? Right now it’s a wide-open race for mayor.’’

If City Council Speaker Christine Quinn becomes mayor, Bratton said he expects her to try to keep incumbent Ray Kelly as commissioner. Quinn declined to comment on Bratton’s remarks.

Bratton said he hasn’t spoken with Kelly about a possible return, and that Kelly ‘‘has been doing a tremendous job.’’

Bratton was Boston police commissioner before leading the NYPD, and he became chief of police of Los Angeles in 2002. In 2011, Britain’s prime minister, David Cameron, turned to Bratton for advice after a wave of violence hit cities in England.

Bratton said Wednesday that Britain is considering a measure that would allow foreigners to hold high positions in police forces, and he said he would be interested in such a post.

He said he is currently consulting for Oakland, Calif., and Detroit. He is an adviser at the Kroll risk consulting company and has his own consulting company, he said.

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.