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Report on pipeline draws few conclusions

Republican Senator John Hoeven of North Dakota spoke at a January news conference about the Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring oil from Canada to Gulf Coast refineries.

AP file

Republican Senator John Hoeven of North Dakota spoke at a January news conference about the Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring oil from Canada to Gulf Coast refineries.

WASHINGTON — The State Department issued a revised environmental impact statement for the 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, which makes no recommendation about whether the project should be built but presents no conclusive environmental reason it should not be.

The lengthy document also draws no conclusions on whether the pipeline is in the United States’ economic and energy interests, a determination to be made later this year by President Obama. But it will certainly add a new element to the already robust climate change and energy debate around the $7 billion proposed project.

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The study will help guide the president’s decision, but it does not make the politics any easier. Environmental advocates and landowners along the route have mounted noisy protests against the project, including a large demonstration in Washington last month, and view Keystone as a test of Obama’s seriousness about addressing global warming.

The president faces equally strong pressure from industry, the Canadian government, many Republicans, and some Democrats in Congress, local officials, and union leaders, who say the project will create thousands of jobs and provide a secure source of oil that will replace crude from Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, and other potentially hostile suppliers.

The draft report, which updates a 2011 study that essentially gave the project a green light, weighs the impact of the pipeline, which would carry about 800,000 barrels a day of heavy crude oil from tar sands formations in Alberta across the Great Plains to Gulf Coast refineries. Obama rejected the original route proposed by the pipeline operator, TransCanada, because of potential adverse effects on sensitive grasslands and aquifers in Nebraska.

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