Read as much as you want on BostonGlobe.com, anywhere and anytime, for just 99¢.

Celtics Live

0

0

Game starts at 7:30 PM

Disabled Iowa plant workers awarded $240M

IOWA CITY, Iowa — A jury awarded $240 million on Wednesday to 32 mentally disabled men for what government lawyers say was years of abuse by a Texas company that arranged for them to work at an Iowa turkey processing plant and oversaw their care, work, and lodging.

The award handed out by a federal jury in Davenport was the largest ever given in the 48-year history of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which filed the lawsuit against Henry’s Turkey Service.

Continue reading below

The jury determined that the now-defunct Goldthwaite, Texas, company had violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by creating a hostile environment and imposing discriminatory conditions of employment on the men. It found that Henry’s acted with ‘‘malice or reckless indifference’’ to their civil rights, and awarded each man $7.5 million in damages.

The verdict is in addition to $1.3 million in back wages that a judge awarded last year. The men had been working at the West Liberty Foods plant under Henry’s oversight since the 1970s, but never received a raise from the $65 per month that Henry’s paid them after deducting what it said were the costs of room and board.

The abuse was uncovered in 2009 after one of the men’s sisters tipped off Iowa officials to the unsafe and unsanitary conditions at the rural bunkhouse where the men were housed. State inspectors found the building, which is a several miles from the West Liberty plant where the men worked, to be falling apart, infested with rodents, and full of fire hazards, so they shut it down and placed the men with new caretakers. The EEOC later sued.

Social workers testified that the men described a life of constant abuse by their Henry’s handlers. They said they had been forced to work through illness and injuries, denied bathroom breaks, locked in their rooms, kicked in the groin, and, in one case, handcuffed to a bed.

EEOC lawyer Robert Canino said he was elated at the verdict, which sends a message to the men that their lives matter.

‘‘This case moved me to great emotion because of the issue of exploitation of vulnerable populations,’’ he said. ‘‘If ever there was a case where the human story needed to be told, the full story, not just financial exploitation, but the devaluation of human life that can happen under the control of an employer, it was this case.’’

He said the evidence showed ‘‘an unprecedented story of a pervasive and hostile environment.’’

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

You have reached the limit of 5 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com