Nation

200-year-old Alaskan village found

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Brown University archaeologists have uncovered the site of a village in northwest Alaska that is believed to be at least 200 years old.

The village dig is in Kobuk Valley National Park about 20 miles up the Kobuk River from the community of Kiana, according to KSKA .

Arctic archaeologist Doug Anderson estimates about 200 people lived in the village, which he believes was a regional capital. Researchers think the village dates from the late 1700s to the early 1800s, just before initial contact with explorers.

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The discovered dwellings, connected by a web of tunnels, are the size of a one-room cabin and are dug about 4 feet into the ground. The structures are framed by spruce beams and poles with sod and earth walls and a fireplace at the center.

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Researchers found signs that villagers lived closely with dogs. They also found two sets of human remains in one dwelling. One of the sets was of a young child, while the other was a man with a broken leg. The remains eventually will be returned for burial.

Kiana is 510 miles northwest of Anchorage and 57 miles east of Kotzebue.

associated press