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Ohio’s Republican governor expands Medicaid

City Council questionnaire   
Would you support a Home Rule Petition to change the Charter of the City Council so it could be given more authority? Do you support a Walmart opening in Boston? Would you vote for the arbitration award for the police patrolmen’s union? Should the cap on charter schools be lifted?Would you march in the South Boston parade?Do you support the Suffolk Downs casino? Do you support an East Boston-only vote on the planned casino?
ANNISSA ESSAIBI-GEORGEYes.No.Yes.No.No.N/AYes.
MICHAEL FLAHERTYI would certainly strongly consider any such proposal. Ultimately this would require approval by the state legislature, a process that would likely take years to produce a result. Measures that could help right away would be a term limit for the office of mayor, subject to voter approval, and holding council elections coterminous the election for mayor. This year such a dynamic produced the most diverse field in years in both the mayor and council races, with a dramatic increase in civic participation and exchange of new and good ideas.Yes, I support a Walmart in Boston that pays fair wages and provides adequate employee benefits. Our city’s police officers do an outstanding job protecting our public safety and deserve fair wages for their work and quite frankly should not have been made to wait so long for a contract. However, this contract is flawed on multiple levels, starting with the fact that it does not contain language for mandatory random drug and alcohol testing similar to what we demanded and secured in the fire fighters contract. This contract is also backloaded, which is unfair to younger officers and retirement-ready officers alike. My hope is the parties will go back to the negotiation table to secure mandatory random testing and mutually agreeable contract language on salary, benefits and retroactive pay that is evenly distributed and fair to all officers, not just some.I would prefer to take the best practices of charter schools and work to implement them in main line schools, with the cooperation and collective bargaining consent of the city’s teachers union. We must work towards a single track of excellent public schools in Boston, as opposed to two-tier system that leaves some students in underperforming schools.Yes, I have marched in the parade my entire life while always being a strong advocate of LGBT rights. The parade issue has never defined me as an elected official or shaped my LGBT views. In fact, I was the first citywide elected official to support marriage equality long before the SJC’s Goodrich decision, at a time when most elected officials were still grappling with legalizing domestic partnerships and civil unions. Yes, if the residents of East Boston vote to support it. If there is to be an eastern Massachusetts casino, I believe it should be located in Boston because of the infrastructure improvements, revenue stream, and jobs that would result.Yes, East Boston will by far be the most heavily-impacted community.
JACK F. KELLY N/ANo.Yes.No.No.Yes.Yes.
MARTIN J. KEOGHYesThe only companies I will support coming into Boston are those that provide equal pay, a fair working environment and standard health benefits for employeesYes.No.No, nor any other parade that is not inclusive of everyone. Yes.Yes.
STEPHEN J. MURPHYYes.Yes, but not a super store Walmart, one that is more conscious of the structure of Boston neighborhoods. The opening of a small scale Walmart should support the businesses in the neighborhood, not consume them. I have been very public about my reservations with this award. The City Council is doing due diligence on this matter before voting on it. No, although charter schools fill a gap in Boston Public School education, I believe we should direct funds and efforts toward our public schools. Yes.Yes.Yes.
AYANNA PRESSLEYYes. Walmart is a poor choice for Boston for many reasons. First, it is a jobs killer. It hurts small business, often driving them out of business through predatory pricing practices. Second, because they underpay their workforce and often don’t offer health insurance, taxpayers often end up subsidizing their workforce. Third, Walmart is known to use hardline tactics to prevent unions from organizing their workers. We need better businesses in Boston than that. This is a serious issue that deserves my full attention and study. The Administration and BPPA have been privately negotiating since 2010. The Council is trying to quickly digest the two sides’ arguments and contradictory statistics. I am reviewing the data presented by both parties at the Council’s October 15th hearing and awaiting response from the arbitrator about his decision rationale. I have an obligation under the law and as a City Councilor to scrutinize the fiscal impact of the award. But I also know that our police officers work hard to keep our City safe, often putting their own lives at risk. I am also increasingly concerned that we have created a two-tiered public employee system that pits workers and families against each other, and leaves lower paid city employees more vulnerable to pay cuts and staff reductions. I am withholding judgment until I have received all requested information. The charter schools in Boston have demonstrated many successes and positive outcomes for the children they serve, and I believe parents should have a range of educational options to choose from for their children. What I find disturbing, however, is the low numbers of ELL and special needs children who find their way into those schools, while the funding mechanism doesn’t account for that. The number of seats available in charter schools should be increased somewhat, but we cannot think we can “charter” our way to a schools solution. We need to focus our resources and energies on the 58,000 children in the traditional public schools first.Not until it our LGBTQ neighbors can march. I am not a fan of a resort-style casino easily accessible in an urban environment. I recognize that Beacon Hill has spoken on casinos in Massachusetts, even though that wouldn’t have been my preference. But I will not recuse my seat at the table to make sure that if a casino does come to Eastern Massachusetts, it brings good jobs and the public ills are mitigated.Yes.
JEFFREY ROSSYes.No.No. I am the only candidate to take a public stand against the arbitration award. I believe we need more concessions around community policing. Officers deserve a raise but not at this level.No.No. Not until LGBT groups are allowed to openly march in the parade. If elected as an openly gay city councilor, I would continue to push for inclusion in the parade. I support the results of the East Boston Vote. This issue has been voted on and decided by the city council.
MICHELLE WUYes.No.No. Our city jobs should be good jobs that provide economic stability for families while also managing the City’s resources as wisely and efficiently as possible.No. I have visited many schools in the district, from traditional public schools to Commonwealth charter schools, to in-district charter schools. I do not support lifting the charter cap for funding reasons, because our traditional public schools are in need of resources to manage and maintain improvements. I would focus first on encouraging all schools in the district to collaborate more intensively and share best practices so that the great results we see in individual charter schools and traditional public schools can improve schools throughout the district.No. I would not march in any parade that is not open and inclusive to everyone.No. I do not support casinos. I am extremely concerned about any casino’s impacts on mental health, traffic, local small business, and public safety. However, I do believe that Boston should have a say in the Eastern Massachusetts gambling license created by state legislature because we will be dealing with the impacts whether a casino is in Boston or in Everett. I have read the host community agreement, and would have liked to see stronger provisions for bringing casino operators back to the table with the City in case expectations are not met.Yes. The impacts of the casino will be felt most acutely by the residents of East Boston, and I support a neighborhood vote.

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