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Nation

Wide warning on warming in report

WASHINGTON — Many of the ills of the modern world — starvation, poverty, flooding, heat waves, droughts, war and disease — are likely to worsen as the world warms from man-made climate change, a leaked draft of an international scientific report forecasts.

The report uses the word ‘‘exacerbate’’ repeatedly to describe warming’s effect on poverty, lack of water, disease, and even the causes of war.

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The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will issue a report next March on how global warming is already affecting the way people live and what will happen in the future, including a worldwide drop in income. A leaked copy of a draft of the summary of the report appeared online Friday on a climate skeptic’s website. Governments will spend the next few months making comments about the draft.

‘‘We’ve seen a lot of impacts and they’ve had consequences,’’ said Carnegie Institution climate scientist Chris Field, who heads the report. ‘‘And we will see more in the future.’’

Cities, where most of the world now lives, have the highest vulnerability, as do the globe’s poorest people.

‘‘Throughout the 21st century, climate change impacts will slow down economic growth and poverty reduction, further erode food security and trigger new poverty traps, the latter particularly in urban areas and emerging hotspots of hunger,’’ the report says. ‘‘Climate change will exacerbate poverty in low- and lower-middle income countries and create new poverty pockets in upper-middle to high-income countries with increasing inequality.’’ For people living in poverty, the report says, ‘‘climate-related hazards constitute an additional burden.’’

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