Nation

Candidate who was angered by pol’s put-down of Women’s March defeats him

MAYS LANDING, N.J. — A politician who shared a meme on Facebook during January’s Women’s March in Washington asking whether the protest would be ‘‘over in time for them to cook dinner’’ is eating his words.

A woman who was angered by Republican John Carman’s remarks on Tuesday defeated him in his bid for a second term as an Atlantic County freeholder. Democrat Ashley Bennett, 32, is a first-time candidate. The Egg Harbor Township resident works as a psychiatric emergency screener at Cape Regional Hospital.

Carman called the meme ‘‘a bad choice’’ but said the women in his life were ‘‘strong and confident’’ enough to not be offended by his joke. He apologized a few days later. He later drew more criticism for wearing a confederate flag patch.

Associated Press

Three candidates targeted by racist ads win seats

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HOBOKEN, N.J. — Three Asian-American candidates targeted in racist campaign attacks have won elections in New Jersey. Ravi Bhalla was elected mayor of Hoboken Tuesday, and Jerry Shi and Falguni Patel won seats on the school board in Edison.

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Bhalla had been the subject of anonymously distributed flyers that labeled him a terrorist. They pictured Bhalla with the message ‘‘Don’t let TERRORISM take over our Town!’’ The Indian-American politician called the flyers troubling but said ‘‘we won’t let hate win.’’

Shi and Patel were targeted by mailers that read ‘‘Make Edison Great Again’’ and said ‘‘the Chinese and Indians are taking over our town.’’ It called for the candidates to be deported.

Associated Press

Va. elects the first openly transgender legislator in US

RICHMOND — A woman who is set to become the first openly transgender person to serve in a US legislature brushed off her historic win over one of Virginia’s most conservative lawmakers, saying that she’ll focus on fixing congested roads and making the General Assembly more transparent.

‘‘When we’re talking about it being historic, yeah, it will be historic when a transgender woman finally helps fix Route 28, because that’s what I’m here to do. This is why I ran. I was very, very specific about the issues I was running on,’’ Democrat Danica Roem told FOX 5 in Washington.

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Roem, a former reporter who sings in a metal band in her spare time, defeated long-time Republican Bob Marshall, winning 54 percent of the votes in the northern Virginia House of Delegates district.

She will be the only out trans state legislator in the United States, according to the Victory Fund, a political action committee that works to help get LGBTQ people elected.

Working as a reporter taught her how to listen and understand people, Roem said on her campaign website.

Her opponent was a lightning rod for controversy, sponsoring a bill that would have restricted which bathrooms transgender people could use.

Marshall also authored a now-void constitutional amendment that defined marriage as between one man and one woman and sponsored a bill banning gay people from serving openly in the Virginia National Guard.

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Minneapolis elected Andrea Jenkins, a black transgender woman, to its City Council. Victory Fund said she was the first openly transgender woman elected to a city council of a major US city. Tyler Titus, who is also transgender, won a seat on a western Pennsylvania school board.

Associated Press

NRA-backed candidate loses to boyfriend of gun victim

NEW YORK — Two years after his 24-year-old girlfriend was killed on live TV, a Virginia Democrat on Tuesday defeated an rival who was endorsed by the National Rifle Association for a seat in the Legislature.

Chris Hurst, a former news anchor whose girlfriend and colleague, Alison Parker, was killed on air, overtook Joseph Yost to win the seat. He will be one of two Democrats to represent the state’s conservative southwest region in the House.

On Wednesday, Hurst, 30, described himself as humbled and awe-struck by his victory. He said that before Parker’s death, he had not had political aspirations.

Parker and a cameraman, Adam Ward, were doing a live news segment when they were shot by Vester Lee Flanagan II, who had been a reporter at the station, WDBJ in Roanoke.

Flanagan later killed himself.

Hurst was the only House candidate in Virginia who was endorsed by the advocacy group known as Everytown for Gun Safety.

But he chose not to make gun control a key campaign issue even as he ran against Yost, a three-term incumbent with an A rating from the National Rifle Association.

Hurst focused instead on mental health, as well as issues like health care and education funding.

New York Times