You can now read 10 articles each month for free on BostonGlobe.com.

The Boston Globe

Metro

Warren hits Brown over his use of health law

Elizabeth Warren raised the topic, first reported in Tuesday’s Globe, as she addressed the AFL-CIO’s Building and Construction Trades Department in Washington.

Steven Senne/Associated Press

Elizabeth Warren raised the topic, first reported in Tuesday’s Globe, as she addressed the AFL-CIO’s Building and Construction Trades Department in Washington.

Democrat Elizabeth Warren said Tuesday that “it is wrong’’ that Senator Scott Brown has voted to block and repeal President Obama’s health care overhaul while he continues to insure his nearly 24-year-old daughter through an extended-coverage provision in the law.

Warren raised the topic, first reported in Tuesday’s Globe, as she addressed the AFL-CIO’s Building and Construction Trades Department in Washington.

Continue reading below

“We now live in a world in which America’s middle class is getting hammered on health care costs,’’ Warren says in a video snippet placed on YouTube by her supporters. “My Republican opponent, Scott Brown, campaigned, campaigned against health care reform. And when he got to the Senate, he voted to block health care reform. We just learned today, back in Massachusetts, that he is using that same health care reform act to make sure that his adult daughter gets covered on his health insurance policy, at the same moment that he wants to repeal it for everyone else.’’

As the crowd applauded her, Warren added: “This is wrong. This is wrong.’’

The 2010 Obama law mandated that all family policies cover children until age 26, several years after many would have previously lost coverage.

For federal employees, including members of Congress, the law extended the coverage cutoff by four years, from 22 to 26.

Brown campaigned during his January 2010 special election on a vow to be the 41st Republican vote to block the measure. He failed to do so after taking office, but has since voted three times to repeal it.

Continue reading below

Yet during an interview with the Globe on Monday, Brown acknowledged that he takes advantage of the law to keep his elder daughter, Ayla, on his congressional health insurance plan. The 23-year-old is a professional singer and network television correspondent.

“Of course I do,’’ Brown said.

Brown’s younger daughter, Arianna, is 21 and graduating this spring after just three years at Syracuse University. She, too, will be eligible to keep her coverage after graduation.

The senator said the extended use of his insurance policy is not inconsistent with his criticism of the federal law, because the same coverage could be required by individual states.

On the campaign trail this year, Brown has said he still wants to repeal the federal law, which he argues is inferior to a health care overhaul enacted by Massachusetts in 2006.

Glen Johnson can be reached at johnson@globe.com.

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than $1 a week