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    What you need to know after N.H. primary

    What happened in New Hampshire?

    Businessman Donald Trump won the state’s Republican primary -- by a landslide. Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a relatively moderate candidate , came in second place for the GOP. Sen. Bernie Sanders won on the Democratic side, while former secretary of state Hillary Clinton’s defeat was so resounding that her campaign conceded immediately when the polls closed at 8 p.m.

    Tuesday’s New Hampshire vote marked the first-in-the-nation primary. Unlike last week’s caucuses when Iowans gathered to support their candidates, voters in New Hampshire simply showed up to the polls and cast their ballots.

    What does it mean?

    These are remarkable victories for two outsiders who tapped into voter anger at the two parties’ establishments.

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    For the Democrats: The outcome means a fresh burst of momentum for Sanders as he heads into states that will prove more challenging for him. Looking ahead, it is widely expected that the race will grow more combative as Clinton tries to regain her footing.

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    For the Republicans: Trump’s win is a big deal, but the second and third place winners matter too. Those coveted slots in Tuesday’s primary (second went to Kasich) are positions that could make the difference between a candidate continuing on as a credible alternative in the race and being forced out.

    What’s next?

    Next up is Feb. 20, when Republicans vote in the South Carolina primary, and Democrats vote in the Nevada caucuses. Tuesday’s results could draw out both nomination battles well into the spring.

    For the Democrats: Clinton plans to turn to states with large minority populations. She has scheduled campaign stops in South Carolina and Nevada in the next week, with an emphasis on criminal justice and gun control, issues on which she has attempted to get out ahead of Sanders or to his political left.

    For the Republicans: As the GOP candidates head into South Carolina, the race is likely to get even more heated. Trump heads to South Carolina with a new burst of confidence and momentum. But Iowa and New Hampshire exposed weaknesses in Trump’s campaign that, if not corrected, could become liabilities in the coming weeks. Second-place winner Kasich may have trouble getting the party behind him in the next few primary states.