Europe’s Neanderthals died out earlier than thought

DNA analysis shows that Neanderthals (right) and modern humans (left) coexisted and interbred in Western Asia, and that they probably had cultural contact in Europe as well.

Frank Franklin II/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Neanderthals, the heavy-browed relatives of modern humans, spread out across Europe and Asia about 200,000 years ago. But when did they die out?

Ebola has ‘upper hand’ says US health official

Ebola still has the ‘‘upper hand’’ in the outbreak that has killed more than 1,400 people in West Africa.

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Why are ocean sunfish causing beach closures?

This friendly plankton feeder has twice closed South Shore beaches after being confused for a shark.

Anglers play role in spread of invasive fish, data show

Inadequate regulation of the bait fish trade and carelessness on the part of anglers may be allowing invasive species to reach the Great Lakes and inland waterways.

Researchers find harmful ozone in Colorado mountains

Researchers gathered data from aircraft, balloons, and ground stations from the south Denver area to Fort Collins.

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