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Rebels, militants seize base in Syria

Al Qaeda group joins in attack

BEIRUT — Fighters from a shadowy militant group with suspected links to Al Qaeda joined Syrian rebels in seizing a government missile defense base in northern Syria on Friday, according to activists and amateur video.

It was unclear if the rebels were able to hold the base after the attack, and analysts questioned whether they would be able to make use of any of the missiles they may have spirited away.

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Nevertheless, the assault underscored fears of advanced weaponry falling into the hands of extremists playing an increasingly large role in Syria’s civil war.

Videos purportedly shot inside the air defense base and posted online stated that the extremist group, Jabhat al-Nusra, participated in the overnight battle near the village of al-Taaneh, three miles east of the country’s largest city, Aleppo. The videos show dozens of fighters inside the base near a radar tower, along with rows of large missiles, some on the backs of trucks.

A report by a correspondent with the Arabic satellite network Al Jazeera who visited the base Friday said Jabhat al-Nusra took the lead in the attack, killing three guards and taking others prisoner before seizing the base. The report showed a number of missiles and charred buildings, as well as fighters wearing black masks.

Two Aleppo-based activists and Rami Abdul-Rahman, head of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, also said Jabhat al-Nusra fought in the battle with other rebel groups. They disputed the notion that the extremist group had the lead role in the attack, however.

It was impossible to independently verify the videos and conflicting reports because of restrictions on reporting in Syria.

Despite Western opposition to President Bashar Assad’s regime, the United States and other countries have cited the presence of extremists among the rebels as a reason not to supply the Syrian insurgents with weapons. They have repeatedly cited concerns of heavy weaponry falling into wrong hands.

Rebel leaders argue that arms shortages mean they will take aid from whoever offers it, regardless of their ideology.

The capture of the base also plays into fears about extremists acquiring Syria’s chemical and biological weapons — particularly if the Assad regime collapses and loses control of them.

Neighboring Jordan’s King Abdullah II fears such weapons could go to Al Qaeda or other militants, primarily the Iranian-allied Lebanese Hezbollah. The United States has sent about 150 troops to Jordan, largely Army special operations forces, to bolster the kingdom’s military capabilities in the event Syria’s civil war escalates.

Syria is believed to have one of the world’s largest chemical weapons programs, and the regime has said it might use the weapons against external threats, though not against Syrians.

Western powers — and many Syrians — worry that Islamist extremists are playing an increasing role in Syria’s civil war, which started in March 2011 as a mostly peaceful uprising against Assad.

Little is known about Jabhat al-Nusra, or the Support Front, which began claiming attacks in Syria earlier this year in postings on jihadi forums often used by Al Qaeda.

While neither group has officially acknowledged a link to the other, analysts say al-Nusra’s tactics, rhetoric and use of Al Qaeda forums point to an affiliation.

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