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BBC chair says scandal has revealed a ‘ghastly mess’

LONDON - NOVEMBER 11: (NO SALE/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout image provided by the BBC, chairman of the BBC Trust Chris Patten is interviewed on the Andrew Marr show on November 11, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Jeff Overs/BBC via Getty Images) Warning: Use of this copyright image is subject to Terms of Use of BBC Digital Picture Service. In particular, this image may only be used during the publicity period for the purpose of publicising "Andrew Marr Show" and provided the BBC is credited.

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LONDON - NOVEMBER 11: (NO SALE/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout image provided by the BBC, chairman of the BBC Trust Chris Patten is interviewed on the Andrew Marr show on November 11, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Jeff Overs/BBC via Getty Images) Warning: Use of this copyright image is subject to Terms of Use of BBC Digital Picture Service. In particular, this image may only be used during the publicity period for the purpose of publicising "Andrew Marr Show" and provided the BBC is credited.

LONDON — The BBC’s chairman said Sunday that the broadcasting organization was in a ‘‘ghastly mess’’ as a result of its bungled coverage of a decades-old sexual abuse scandal and was in need of a fundamental shake-up.

“Does the BBC need a thorough structural overhaul? Of course it does,’’ the chairman of the BBC Trust, Chris Patten, said on ‘‘The Andrew Marr Show,’’ the BBC’s flagship Sunday morning talk show, after the resignation of the broadcaster’s chief executive.

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But although Patten has said that the BBC’s handling of the scandal was marked by ‘‘unacceptably shoddy journalism,’’ he pushed back on the Marr show against suggestions that the crisis could lead to a dismantling of the BBC as it now exists, with 23,000 employees, a $6 billion annual budget, and a dominant role in British broadcasting.

Patten, 68, a former Conservative cabinet minister who gained a reputation for independence when he was Britain’s last colonial governor in Hong Kong, said critics of the BBC should not lose sight of its reputation at home and abroad for impartial, trustworthy journalism.

‘‘The BBC is and has been hugely respected around the world,’’ he said. ‘‘But we have to earn that. If the BBC loses that, then it is over.’’

Public confidence in the BBC has slumped further in opinion polls in the wake of its coverage of a scandal involving allegations of abuses by a senior politician at a children’s home in Wales in the 1970s and ‘80s. But the British public would not support breaking up the BBC, Patten said, adding, ‘‘The BBC is one of the things that has come to define and reflect Britishness, and we shouldn’t lose that.’’

Barely 12 hours earlier, Patten stood outside the BBC’s new billion-dollar London headquarters with George Entwistle, the departing director-general, as Entwistle announced his resignation after just eight weeks in the job to atone for his failings in dealing with what he called ‘‘the exceptional events of the past few weeks.’’

‘The BBC is . . . hugely respected around the world. But we have to earn that. If the BBC loses that, then it is over.’’’

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Entwistle’s resignation was prompted by outrage about a Nov. 2 report on ‘‘Newsnight,’’ a current affairs program, that wrongly implicated a former Conservative Party politician in the scandal.

Responding to reports that the ‘‘Newsnight’’ segment was broadcast without some basic fact-checking that would have exculpated the 70-year-old, retired politician it implicated, Alistair McAlpine, Entwistle said it reflected ‘‘unacceptable journalistic standards’’ and never should have been broadcast.

That episode, which McAlpine’s lawyers have said will be the subject of a defamation lawsuit, compounded the problems facing the network since revelations last month about a longtime BBC television host, Jimmy Savile, who died at 84 in 2011. Savile was suspected of having sexually abused as many as 300 young people over decades, in the BBC’s studios and in children’s homes and hospitals where he gained ready access as a campaigner for children’s charities.

The BBC has been accused of covering up the Savile case by canceling a ‘‘Newsnight’’ report on the accusations against him last December and going ahead with several Christmas specials that paid tribute to Savile.

At that time, Entwistle was in charge of all the BBC’s television productions and sought to succeed Mark Thompson, who stepped down in September after eight years as director-general.

On Monday, Thompson begins his new job as president and chief executive of The New York Times. He has said he knew nothing beforehand about the ‘‘Newsnight’’ investigation of Savile or the decision to scrap it — not even that it involved allegations of pedophilia — and that he had never met Savile. But Thompson has said that he is willing to answer any questions put to him by a parliamentary inquiry or other investigations now underway.

Patten said Sunday that he expected a new director to be appointed within weeks. On Saturday, he announced that Tim Davie, 45, the director of the BBC’s audio and music unit, would serve as the acting director-general.

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