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Israel considers assassination tactics

Would target militant leaders over rocket attacks

Rockets fired as part of Israel’s Iron Dome defense system have shot down dozens of missiles from the Gaza Strip.

ARIEL SCHALIT/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE

Rockets fired as part of Israel’s Iron Dome defense system have shot down dozens of missiles from the Gaza Strip.

JERUSALEM — Israel is considering resuming its contentious practice of assassinating militant leaders in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip in an effort to halt intensified rocket attacks on Israel’s south, according to defense officials.

That Israel might renew a practice that brought it harsh international censure is evidence of the tight spot Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is in.

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With Israeli elections two months away, rocket barrages from Gaza are disrupting the lives of 1 million residents of southern Israel, pressuring the government to come up with an effective response.

In the latest flare-up, Gaza militants have fired more than 100 rockets at Israel in recent days, triggering retaliatory Israeli air strikes that have killed six people in Gaza.

Some Israelis are demanding a harsh military move, perhaps a repeat of Israel’s bruising incursion into Gaza four years ago.

Others believe Israel should target Hamas leaders, a method it used to kill dozens of militants nearly a decade ago.

Advocates say targeted killings are an effective deterrent without the complications associated with a ground operation, chiefly civilian and Israeli troop casualties. Proponents argue they also prevent future attacks by removing their masterminds.

Critics say they invite retaliation by militants and encourage them to try to assassinate Israeli leaders.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday visited the southern city of Beesheba, where he told municipal officials that Israel will strike back against the Palestinian attacks.

‘‘Whoever believes they can harm the daily lives of the residents of the south and not pay a heavy price is mistaken. I am responsible for choosing the right time to collect the highest price and so it shall be,’’ Netanyahu said.

Defense officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the assassination of Hamas leaders is shaping up as the preferred response to the stepped-up rocket fire.

They have the backing of two former military chiefs with experience in the matter.

Opposition lawmaker Shaul Mofaz served as military chief of staff and defense minister when Israel began a wave of assassinations against Hamas and other militant leaders in the early part of the past decade.

He and other former senior defense officials contend these assassinations left the Hamas leadership in disarray and put a halt to the rash of Hamas suicide bombings that killed hundreds of Israelis.

‘‘I’m in favor of targeted killings,’’ Mofaz told Army Radio on Monday. ‘‘It is a policy that led Hamas to understand, during the suicide bombings, that they would pay the price should [the bombings] continue.’’

Vice Premier Moshe Yaalon, chief of staff at the time targeted killings surged, is convinced the practice worked.

‘‘Clearly over these past 13 years there has been an ongoing war, but there have also been extended periods of calm,’’ Yaalon told Army Radio on Monday. ‘‘When I was chief of staff, the targeted killings against Hamas led to extended periods of quiet.’’

Hamas dismissed the threat of targeted killings as ‘‘psychological warfare,’’ and its political leaders were not in hiding. The group’s military commanders tend to keep a low profile anyway, for fear of Israeli assassination attempts.

Hamas’s prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, visited a Gaza hospital on Tuesday and met with Palestinians wounded in the latest fighting.

‘‘Threats of assassination and killing do not scare us and will not break our morale or our steadfastness,’’ he told reporters.

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