World

Detective guilty in UK hacking case

LONDON — A top counterterrorism detective was found guilty Thursday of trying to sell information to a Rupert Murdoch tabloid, becoming the first person to be convicted on charges related to Britain’s phone-hacking scandal since a police investigation was reopened in early 2011.

Detective Chief Inspector April Casburn was charged with misconduct for phoning the News of the World and offering to pass on information about whether London’s police force would reopen its stalled phone-hacking investigation.

Prosecutors said the tabloid did not print a story based on her call and no money changed hands. However, she committed a “gross breach” of the public trust by offering to sell the information.

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Casburn, 53, was also accused of trying to ruin the inquiry, which centered on journalists at the now-defunct News of the World, by leaking information to the press.

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A Metropolitan Police statement said selling confidential information to journalists for gain would not be tolerated, and that the detective had “abused” her police position.

“Casburn proactively approached the News of the World, the very newspaper being investigated, to make money,” the police statement said. “She betrayed the service and let down her colleagues.”

The statement said vital information was given to police by the Management and Standards Committee at Murdoch’s News Corp.

Casburn, who managed the Metropolitan Police terrorist financing investigation unit, had admitted contacting the newspaper but denied that she offered confidential information or sought payment.

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Jurors at Southwark Crown Court found her guilty of one count of misconduct. She will be sentenced later this month.

The long-running phone-hacking scandal has led to dozens of arrests and to criminal charges against prominent journalists, including Prime Minister David Cameron’s former communications chief.

Associated Press