You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Red Sox Live

4

3

▼  9th Inning 2 outs

106 rescued off Australian coast

SYDNEY — Rescuers pulled more than 100 suspected asylum seekers to safety on Tuesday after their boat sank in the Indian Ocean.

The boat sank about 140 miles north of Christmas Island, where Australia operates a detention camp for asylum seekers. An Australian navy ship hurried to the scene after the Australian Maritime Safety Authority received a call for help on Tuesday morning. When the navy ship arrived, the boat was partially submerged and passengers were struggling in the water.

Continue reading below

Rescuers plucked 106 people to safety, the Customs and Border Protection agency said in a statement. Two people had minor injuries.

The search-and-rescue effort was continuing Tuesday afternoon, though it was unclear whether more people were missing. The maritime authority initially estimated 105 people were on board the stricken vessel.

Christmas Island, located 310 miles south of Jakarta, Indonesia, is a popular destination for asylum seekers who crowd into rickety boats at Indonesian ports and pay smugglers to take them to Australian shores. Hundreds have died while attempting the journey in recent years.

Australia is trying to discourage such risky journeys and announced last month it would no longer accept asylum seekers who arrive by boat. Instead, it is evaluating their claims and resettling verified refugees in Papua New Guinea or the tiny Pacific island nation of Nauru.

The rescue came as government officials from 13 countries met Tuesday in Jakarta to discuss ways to better cooperate on the asylum seeker issue and stop smugglers of people. In a final declaration, they agreed to review visa policies, enhance coordination, and exchange information to deny entry and cancel the visas of smugglers and traffickers.

It said the countries of origin, transit, and destination are committed to working together to develop an early-warning system and share information and intelligence among diplomatic, immigration, border, and law enforcement officers.

‘‘We are taking every possible step we can to disrupt their networks, and make those who are responsible accountable for their actions,’’ Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa of Indonesia said.

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

You have reached the limit of 5 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.