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Agreement allows US to fly drones from base in Japan

Pentagon gets northeast Asia rights for 1st time

TOKYO — The US military will deploy long-range Global Hawk surveillance drones from Japan next year, American and Japanese officials announced on Thursday, marking the first time the Pentagon has been able to secure basing rights for the advanced unmanned aircraft in northeast Asia.

The Air Force will begin flying ‘‘two or three’’ Global Hawks from an undetermined base in Japan next spring, a senior US administration official told reporters during a visit here by Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.

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The drones’ primary mission will be to fly near North Korea, an area where US officials hope they will greatly enhance current spying capabilities. The Air Force already has Global Hawks stationed at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, the US territory in the Pacific, but North Korea is at the edge of their range and their flights often are curtailed because of bad weather.

The Air Force also has Global Hawks stationed in the Persian Gulf.

The unarmed drones carry multiple spy sensors and are the most advanced surveillance aircraft in the Air Force’s fleet. They fly at altitudes above 60,000 feet, placing them out of range of most air defenses. Without pilots in the cockpit, they can fly for more than 28 hours at a time, giving them an unmatched range of nearly 9,000 nautical miles.

The presence of Global Hawks is sure to irritate China, which has increasingly pushed back against the US military presence in the region. Officials in Beijing had criticized Tokyo in recent days over reports that the Japanese military was considering acquiring its own Global Hawks, saying the move could escalate tensions.

China is also engaged in a bitter territorial dispute with Japan over the Senkaku Islands, an uninhabited group of outcroppings in the East China Sea that Japan nationalized last year, sparking confrontations between the two countries’ ships deployed in the area.

Besides flying missions over North Korea, the Global Hawks would presumably give the United States and Japan better information about the movements of Chinese ships in the vicinity of Senkaku.

The same goes for Chinese ships elsewhere in the region, such as the South China Sea, where China is mired in territorial disputes with the Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, and other countries.

The US military has flown drones over Japan in the past on a temporary basis, including after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, but next year will mark the first time it will base them in that country, according to US officials. They said the drones would be deployed on a rotational basis, meaning they could be moved elsewhere, such as Guam, for months at a time.

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