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Sri Lanka monks rally against Islam

Hard-liners say Muslims a threat, attack mosques

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — With a bloody civil war over and a cautious peace at hand, a group of hard-line Buddhist monks is rallying Sri Lankans against what they say is a pernicious threat: Muslims.

In just over a year, the saffron-swathed monks of Bodu Bala Sena — or Buddhist Power Force — have amassed a huge following, drawing thousands of fist-pumping followers who rail against the country’s Muslim minority.

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Buddhists have attacked dozens of mosques and called for boycotts on Muslim-owned businesses and bans on headscarves and halal foods.

At boisterous rallies, monks say Muslims are out to recruit children, marry Buddhist women, and divide the country.

“This is a Buddhist nation, so why are they trying to call it a multicultural society?” said Galagoda Atte Gnanasara, the 37-year-old pulpit-pounding monk who cofounded the group in 2012. “Not everyone can live under the umbrella of a Buddhist culture.”

There have been few if any physical attacks on people, unlike in Myanmar, where Buddhist monks helped incite communal violence in 2012 and 2013 and even stood watch as Buddhist mobs slaughtered Rohingya Muslims.

But many Sri Lankans and human rights workers are alarmed, saying the monks are creating communal divisions and giving Buddhism a bad name.

Nearly all of the dozen critics of Bodu Bala Sena interviewed for this story declined to speak on the record, fearing reprisals.

The Sri Lankan government only rarely steps in to defend or protect Muslims, who make up roughly 10 percent of the 20 million people on this Indian Ocean island.

Many see the silence as tacit approval, but Media Minister Keheliya Rambukwella said it’s intended to encourage community members to work out their own problems.

“If things get more serious, we will take action,” he said. “These kinds of things can ruin a nation, we are aware of that.”

In September 2011, Buddhists reportedly smashed a 300-year-old Islamic Sufi shrine to rubble in the ancient city of Anuradhapura, a UNESCO world heritage site. In April 2012, a 2,000-strong Sinhalese mob including monks ransacked Jumma Mosque in the north-central city of Dambulla as police looked on.

The government later ordered the removal of the decades-old mosque, saying its location within a sacred Buddhist area was an affront.

In March of last year, police watched as monks led a hollering crowd in trashing a Muslim-owned clothing store.

Many Muslims feel they are being victimized because of their visibility in the economy — a role they have played for more than 1,000 years since Arab traders brought Islam to Sri Lanka and allied with the Sinhalese against Spanish and Dutch colonial forces.

Today, they control at least half of small businesses and hold near-monopolies in the textile and gem trades.

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