You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

The Boston Globe

World

Flooding closes bridges along the Mississippi; high winds injure six in Michigan

A shopping plaza in Grand Rapids, Mich., was heavily damaged by a storm packing winds of 80 miles per hour.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A shopping plaza in Grand Rapids, Mich., was heavily damaged by a storm packing winds of 80 miles per hour.

ST. LOUIS — Two Mississippi River bridges closed due to flooding, and with more storms in the forecast, there was growing concern Monday that conditions could worsen in parts of Missouri and Illinois.

The Champ Clark Bridge at Louisiana, Mo., closed at 5 p.m. Sunday, creating an inconvenience for those who travel between Missouri and Illinois on US 54. The next nearest bridge is in Hannibal, Mo., 35 miles to the north.

Continue reading below

The river is expected to crest nearly 10 feet above flood stage in Louisiana on Tuesday, but it could be the weekend before water is off the road on the Illinois side of the crossing.

The Quincy Memorial Bridge in Quincy, Ill., shut down Monday morning. The impact there wasn’t as severe because Quincy — with 41,000 residents, the largest Mississippi River town between Davenport, Iowa (population 100,000) and St. Louis — has two bridges.

Illinois Department of Transportation spokeswoman Paris Ervin said all traffic is being routed to the Bayview Bridge, which sits higher than the Memorial and is not threatened.

In western Michigan, a severe thunderstorm with winds estimated at more than 80 miles per hour spawned a tornado, injured at least six people, and caused significant damage to homes Michigan, officials said Monday.

Storms with tornadoes also damaged some homes in Iowa.

A fast-moving thunderstorm intensified in Michigan late Sunday over Kentwood, just south of Grand Rapids, the National Weather Service said. The tornado’s winds reached 100 to 110 miles per hour. The tornado knocked down trees and power lines, ripped the roofs of a number of houses and sent two people to hospitals for treatment after their homes collapsed.

Water levels on the Mississippi River shot up in the past couple of weeks due to a series of strong storms in the upper Midwest.

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week