Opinion

Jeff Jacoby

Obama a unifying force? Hardly

‘I saw many signs in this campaign,” said Richard Nixon the day after he was elected president in 1968. “But the one that touched me the most was one that I saw in Deshler, Ohio, at the end of a long day of whistle-stopping . .  . A teenager held up a sign, ‘Bring Us Together.’ And that will be the great objective of this administration at the outset: to bring the American people together.”

Nixon had started using the phrase “Bring Us Together” a couple weeks earlier, after one of his aides spotted the youngster with the sign. Some of the campaign staff were so enamored of the slogan, William Safire later recalled, that they wanted to make it the Inauguration Day theme. The desire to see an incoming president as a unifier, a healer of the national breach, is an old American tradition, especially in times of acrimony and political conflict.

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