Letters

letters

If high court can see cellphones in ‘new world,’ couldn’t they revisit 2d Amendment?

A man took a photo last month outside the Supreme Court, where justices were weighing privacy and technology.
Gary Cameron/Reuters
A man took a photo last month outside the Supreme Court, where justices were weighing privacy and technology.

RE “JUSTICES wary of bids to search cellphones” (Page A1, April 30): In considering whether a suspect’s cellphone is subject to a warrantless search after an arrest, Justice Anthony Kennedy correctly noted, “We’re are living in a new world” with one’s “whole existence exposed on this little device.” Therefore, prior carte blanche rules of search and seizure of cellphones may need revisiting, with the evolution of the technology.

If the Supreme Court justices can see this need to adapt their thinking to modern reality, shouldn’t the court deal equally directly with the fact that the Second Amendment right to bear arms was written in a world of muskets, loaded from powder horns to fire one shot a minute?

It is with similar advancements of technology that we find ourselves living in a “new world” of assault weapons that can fire 10 rounds a second.

Advertisement

Regulating, or even prohibiting, civilian ownership of these weapons of mass killing should not be viewed as a serious deviation from the simple intent of the Constitution’s protections.

Ronald Newbower

Acton