Letters

Take another look at the numbers

“What is Dr. Pipes smoking in his pipe?” — Henry Stimpson

Letters

Our civic survival depends on closing gap in inequality

“Patriotism requires sacrifice, and just like trickle-down economics, it should begin at the top.” — Steven A. Ludsin

Letters

Internet has bred a culture of offensiveness, distrust

“Jeffrey D. Sachs has missed the main driver of the collapse of civic virtue in America: the Internet.” — Colleen Katsuki

Letters

If executives were held accountable, compliance would rival profit as a motivator

“Should not corporate officers, who, as a matter of law, are charged with obligations to exercise due care, pay the costs for their corporate failures to prevent wrongdoing?” — Vince Canzoneri

Letters

As immigration spiked, we became more diverse — and less trusting

“Unfortunately, trust and diversity are fundamentally incompatible goals.” — Frank Messmann

Letters

Sachs series leaves one reader thinking about 2020

“Sachs for president. Really, think about it.” — Monte Allen

Letters

Baker must step up and call for immediate shutdown of Pilgrim nuclear plant

“Governor Baker appears to have washed his hands of responsibility for the ongoing Pilgrim crisis.” — Don Barton

Letters

If Pilgrim staff are ‘overwhelmed,’ that’s a clear warning sign

“If the staff is overwhelmed by just trying to keep the plant in operation, there’s no way that the people who live near the plant are being properly protected.” — Laura Wagner

Letters

Living, uneasily, downwind of Pilgrim nuclear plant

“Living downwind from this failed plant causes us to frequently ponder the ‘what if’ scenario.” — Khristine Hopkins

Letters

Massport sets good example by shedding light on mental health issues

“Logan Airport, with its millions of passengers annually moving through the terminals, is perfectly placed to assist in efforts like these.” — Charles Yelen

Letters

Professor to conservative group: Put me on your watchlist

“I think other professors should do the same to decrease the impact of this group.” — Dr. Hugh Silk

Letters

Her definition of a good day: a Metro section filled with stories of protest

“What better reason could there be to miss classes than to actually learn something about what civic life is all about, and to stand up for facts and against bigotry?” — Lynne Layton

Letters

Police tactics at pipeline protest have been affront to human rights

“The violence has originated from the highly aggressive, militarized police.” — Rachel Folsom

Letters

Public investment in research should be a bipartisan cause

“We need many more people to understand that investing in research is not a waste of money.” — Paola Massoli

Letters

ExxonMobil fighting a losing battle in countersuit

“The First Amendment does not give you the right to commit fraud.” — Wes Henricksen

Letters

The nation needs a forceful voice like Healey’s

“Forceful voices such as Healey’s are likely to be even more important in the new administration.” — Judith C. Alland

Letters

Mass. AG oversteps in what plays as political theater

“This should be on Healey’s own time, and her campaign should pay the expenses, not the taxpayer.” — John Wood

Letters

This clash is not how taxpayer wants his money spent

“If it’s Healey’s next job that is the prize, I’d prefer she not run her fund-raising campaign with my tax dollar.” — Joseph S. Tringale

Letters

Please, can’t self-driving cars rise above Bostonians’ reckless ways?

“Self-driving cars should be part of the new driving culture, not reinforce the old.” — Don Carlson

Letters

Think of what flag means to others before desecrating it

“Maybe they could all use some help from the men and women in the military and public service in explaining what the flag represents to them and why.” — David Mahoney

Letters

The American flag is a living thing

“The code states, ‘The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing.’ ” — John Meinhold

Letters

There is no ‘should’ about flying the flag — that’s what the flag represents

“Hampshire can fly the flag or lower it, as its administrators choose. Without choice, there is no freedom.” — Bill Torcaso

Letters

Crackdown on flag burning won’t play so well abroad

“What will Trump and others say when those protests happen, as they certainly will, in places such as London or Toronto?” — Robert Abruzzo

Letters

Low-income families need a place in the Boston area’s housing picture

“While hourly wages for workers in the 80th percentile in Massachusetts have risen, wages for the low-wage workers in the 20th percentile have dropped 4.7 percent.” — Steve Farrell

Letters

Plan to triple Boston meter rates yet another sign of economic divide

This “will surely deter drivers with minimal disposable incomes from seeking on-street parking.” — Stanley L. Spiegel