Letters

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Mitch McConnell shouldn’t support long-range pollution

The John Amos coal-fired power plant is seen behind a modest home in Poca, West Virginia, in May.
REUTERS/Robert Galbraith
The John Amos coal-fired power plant is seen behind a modest home in Poca, West Virginia, in May.

IT COMES as no surprise that Mitch McConnell, the incoming Senate majority leader, wants to gut the US Environmental Protection Agency’s pollution reduction rules for coal-burning power plants (“McConnell wants to stop coal rules,” Nation, Dec. 18).

Many of these plants are operating in Kentucky, McConnell’s home state. If he wants to discourage opposition to these polluting behemoths, he should make these plants lower the height of their exhaust smokestacks. Many of these stacks are more than 500 feet tall and send their emissions right into the jet stream and directly to land, water, air, and lungs here in the Northeast.

The Government Accountability Office issued a report in 2011 noting that these smokestack heights have no basis in engineering and greatly contribute to interstate transport of pollutants such as greenhouse gases, soot, and mercury, a potent neurotoxin.

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I’m sure McConnell would strenuously object if those of us forced to breathe his supporters’ filth made a pilgrimage to dump our garbage outside his front door. It should come as no surprise that I and others like me strenuously object to Kentucky and other states dumping their garbage outside mine.

Doug Pizzi

Marlborough