College life in the Boston area

February 25, 1955 :The Harvard band marched in a parade in Cambridge in a drive to raise money to buy a new giant drum for the band. “Dimes for the drum” was the slogan as the giant drum bank was pulled in front of Memorial Hall.

Boston Globe Archive

As high school seniors make decisions about which college to attend in the fall, we take a look at the college life of decades past.

From the Archives | The Origins of the Globe

From the archives: March 4, 1872

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2012/03/03/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Boston_Daily_Globe_vol1no1-1125--90x90.jpg The first Boston Globe

Originally called “The Boston Daily Globe,” the first Globe ran eight pages and featured no photos. Click through to see the very first edition of the newspaper.

Editorial | From the archives: March 5, 1972

How the Globe began

The Boston Globe launched its first edition 140 years ago, on Monday, March 4, 1872. This article, published for the Globe’s centennial in 1972, tells the story of how the newspaper began.

More From the Archives

From the Archives | photo gallery

April 29, 1927: A view of Christ Church in the City of Boston, known to everyone as the Old North Church as seen from opposite Hull Street in the North End. Founded in 1722, the church is Boston’s oldest surviving church building. It was here that two lanterns were hung in the steeple on the evening of April 18 1775 as a signal from Paul Revere that the British were marching to Lexington and Concord by sea across the Charles River and not by land. Concord by sea across the Charles River and not by land.

The Old North Church

The Old North Church is where Paul Revere instructed patriots to hang the two lanterns on April 18, 1775, that warned of the impending British troop movement.

From the Archives | John F. Kennedy

From the Archives

Nov. 25, 1963:   Memorial services for President John F. Kennedy were held in front of the State House timed precisely to those at Arlington National Cemetery. In reverent silence stood nearly 10,000 mourners including 2,000 National Guardsmen at rigid attention along Beacon Street. Church bells from the steeple of nearby Park Street Church and St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral tolled solemnly. The religious-military services concluded on the mournful notes of Taps blown by buglers from three different points. As the notes finished, a squadron of 12 jet fighters of the 102d Tactical Fighter Wings zoomed over the gold dome of the State House.

Remembering John F. Kennedy

Fifty years ago the nation was shocked and saddened by the assassination of President John. F Kennedy.