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What They Were Thinking

What They Were Thinking: Battle at the Bay boxers

Amateur boxer Nick Capobianco (right), an automotive technician, was sent to a neutral corner by referee Dan Conway after knocking down Joel Del Tufo, a truck driver, during the third and final round of their “Battle at the Bay’’ fight.

Stan Grossfeld/Globe Staff

Amateur boxer Nick Capobianco (right), an automotive technician, was sent to a neutral corner by referee Dan Conway after knocking down Joel Del Tufo, a truck driver, during the third and final round of their “Battle at the Bay’’ fight.

Every Sunday, Boston Globe photographer Stan Grossfeld asks the subject of one of his photos to explain what’s happening in the shot.

Who's up today: Amateur boxer Nick Capobianco (right), an automotive technician, was sent to a neutral corner by referee Dan Conway after knocking down Joel Del Tufo, a truck driver, during the third and final round of their “Battle at the Bay’’ fight, part of an event that raised $50,000 for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, at Marina Bay Sportsplex, Quincy, March 23, 2012.

Capobianco: “At the time, I thought, ‘I finally knocked him down.’ He came at me with it all. It was good we respect each other. We didn’t want to hurt each other, but we were both out for the charity. I was trying to jab the hell out of him but he rocked me a few times. When he went down, I knew I didn’t hurt him, but I said, ‘Wow.’ It took a second to register. Finally I stepped back and went to the neutral corner while he took the 8-count. It was at the end of the fight, we had gone the three rounds, but he got right back up and we went at it again.’’

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Del Tufo: “He was cooking with gas. He hit me with some good jabs. I was training hard for this. But I only fought once before in Golden Gloves, 30 years ago in Lowell. I did this because my cousin, Joey Merlo, he’s got pancreatic cancer. He’s young. I did it for him and my other friend, Jimmy O’Malley from the Eire Pub; he’s got cancer, too. I had a choice to fight for them, but people who get cancer have no choice. You don’t think too much when you get hit. You don’t want to go down, but I just happened to go down. I wasn’t staying down. I didn’t want to quit. My buddies can’t quit. So I did it for them, fighting as hard as I could.’’

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