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Sanya Richards-Ross objects to marketing policy

‘‘I've been very fortunate to do very well around the Olympics, but so many of my peers struggle in this sport. And I just think it’s unjust,’’ American sprinter Sanya Richards-Ross said Monday.

Paul Hackett/Reuters

“I've been very fortunate to do very well around the Olympics, but so many of my peers struggle in this sport. And I just think it’s unjust,’’ American sprinter Sanya Richards-Ross said Monday.

LONDON — Money is probably not a worry for American sprinter Sanya Richards-Ross. She has endorsement deals with BMW and Nike and is married to Jaguars cornerback Aaron Ross, who will earn $15 million over the next three seasons.

But there are restrictions on what Richards-Ross and other Olympians can promote at the London Games. That has upset some competitors, who want organizers to change the policy — especially to help athletes without lucrative sponsorship deals.

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‘‘I've been very fortunate to do very well around the Olympics, but so many of my peers struggle in this sport. And I just think it’s unjust,’’ Richards-Ross said Monday.

Richards-Ross, who also sells autographed photos and posters on her website, was among the athletes taking part in a Twitter campaign, using the hashtags ‘‘WeDemandChange2012’’ and ‘‘Rule40.’’

Rule 40 is the International Olympic Committee policy barring Olympic athletes from using their names or likenesses for advertising during the Games.

The IOC says it pours 94 percent of its commercial revenue back into sports, and is only trying to protect the money that comes into the Olympic movement.

‘‘A huge number of 10,500 athletes who are here would understand why we are doing this,’’ IOC spokesman Mark Jones said. ‘‘For one month, we ask them not to endorse products not related to the Olympics that don’t actually give money back to the movement.’’

Sponsorship is everywhere at the Olympics — but official sponsors only.

Richards-Ross said only 2 percent of American athletes can tweet about their sponsors because they have USOC or IOC sponsors.

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