You can now read 10 articles each month for free on BostonGlobe.com.

The Boston Globe

Sports

Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, Adam Scott have eventful day

Tiger Woods (right) shakes hands with Adam Scott after their first day at the US Open was ended on No. 11.

matt sullivan/reuters

Tiger Woods (right) shakes hands with Adam Scott after their first day at the US Open was ended on No. 11.

ARDMORE, Pa. — Those spectators and television viewers anxious to see the 1-2-3 pairing of Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Adam Scott were forced to wait through a 3 ½-hour weather delay on Thursday morning, which pushed the marquee group’s tee time to late afternoon.

When the threesome finally hit the course, they provided a little bit of everything: good play, poor play, and what appeared to be some pain, with Woods wincing repeatedly after hacking out of the thick rough at Merion Golf Club. It looked like Woods was feeling discomfort either with his left hand, wrist, or elbow.

Continue reading below

Because of two weather delays — one in the morning, then another for 45 minutes, starting at 6:10 p.m. — Woods, McIlroy, and Scott couldn’t finish their rounds at the 113th US Open when play was called. Scott completed 11 holes, making a birdie putt on the par 4 to reach 3 under, one shot behind Luke Donald. McIlroy bogeyed No. 11 to drop back to even par.

Woods chose not to attempt his par putt from roughly 5 feet at No. 11 — players have the option of finishing the hole when a suspension is due to darkness — and along with everybody else who didn’t finish will resume the round on Friday at 7:15 a.m. He was 2 over par.

“I’ve got a lot of holes to play tomorrow,” Woods said. “And hopefully I can play a little better than I did today.”

He didn’t mention his apparent pain after play was suspended, but it was obvious that there was some kind of physical issue going on with Woods, as early as the fourth hole. The rough at Merion is thick and heavy, made worse by Thursday’s rain. Anyone hitting out of it runs the potential risk of getting injured.

Woods sent his opening drive well right of the fairway, into the rough. It led to a bogey, the start of an inconsistent 10 holes for Woods that featured four bogeys, four pars, and birdies at Nos. 2 and 6, where he holed a 50-footer.

Continue reading below

Scott, who won the Masters in April, made four birdies (Nos. 3, 4, 8, and 11) to offset a bogey at the difficult fifth. It could have been worse: Scott’s drive on No. 5 settled near a creek, dry and playable, but inside the hazard line. He played out to the fairway, knocked his third shot on, then two-putted for bogey.

The US Golf Association received multiple e-mails and phone calls from viewers after Scott’s second shot, wondering if Scott had grounded his club in a hazard, which would be a penalty. After reviewing the videotape and conferring with Scott and Reed Mackenzie, the walking rules official with the group — both of whom were confident that no infraction had taken place — it was determined that there had been no rules violation.

McIlroy made birdies at the fourth and seventh holes, and also dropped a shot at No. 6 in addition to the 11th. The US Open winner two years ago, McIlroy is looking to win a major championship for the third consecutive season.

Scott is trying to make it two straight majors to start the year, something that hasn’t been done since 2002, when Woods did it. Woods is riding a five-year drought in the majors; the last time he won one, at the 2008 US Open, he did it with a torn anterior cruciate ligament.

You can bet that his left hand/wrist/elbow will be under intense scrutiny come Friday morning. Weather permitting, it figures to be a long day for Woods, McIlroy, and Scott, who will finish their first rounds, then after a short break begin the second.

Michael Whitmer can be reached at mwhitmer@globe.com.

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than $1 a week