Sports

Clayton Kershaw deal could impact Red Sox, Jon Lester

Jon Lester, seen exiting Game 1 of the World Series against the Cardinals at Fenway Park, is entering the final year of his current contract.

Jim Davis/Globe staff

Jon Lester, seen exiting Game 1 of the World Series against the Cardinals at Fenway Park, is entering the final year of his current contract.

With the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw agreeing to a 7-year, $215 million deal today how does that impact the Red Sox re-signing Jon Lester, who will play in his option season in 2014 and could potentially become a free-agent next fall?

The Kershaw deal obviously shows that the price of pitching is going up and that Lester will get his share of the market.

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You can argue Kershaw is in a league of his own, but where does Lester, who was 4-1 in the postseason including a 2-0 with a 0.59 ERA in the World Series and 3-0 and 0.43 ERA in two World Series appearances (‘07 and ’13) fit in?

Lester, who had some ups and downs in 2011 and 2012, corrected those issues this past season and went 15-8. He’s 100-56 (.641) over his career and he just turned 30 years old. If the Red Sox and Lester have begun talks on a new deal, both sides have kept it quiet.

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The Red Sox have taken a wait and see approach to Lester the past couple of years to see if he could work out his mechanical issues, and he did and then some.

So will the Red Sox pay Lester a massive salary, post-30 years old knowing they do have a strong core of young pitchers coming up through the minors, or will they decide, as they did with Jacoby Ellsbury, that they will not commit long-term for those types of dollars?

What isn’t known is whether Lester would do a discounted Dustin Pedroia type deal to stay in Boston.

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Lester has said he’d like to remain a Red Sox.

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