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Jake Peavy doesn’t expect long-term injury effect

FORT MYERS, Fla. – Jake Peavy emerged from the Red Sox clubhouse Monday morning with a white bandage wrapped around his left hand and index finger, the result of suffering a laceration that required stitches and a few days of down time.

“Just getting ready to go fishing ... promised my little boys I’d take them fishing,” Peavy said in explaining the injury. “Went over to Bass Pro and bought them some rod and reels and they were combined. Just tried to cut them, because they were wire-tied, using my knife.

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“With my right hand holding the rod, with my left holding the knife and when I broke the wire tab it (the knife) just stuck my knuckle pretty good,” Peavy explained.

Peavy said he struck a vein and he bled pretty severely all over his shorts. He said he and his boys went to John Lackey’s house, where he discarded the bloody shorts for a new pair.

“It’s a bummer,” Peavy said. “I didn’t think it was that crazy bad to the point where I didn’t seek medical attention that day. We wrapped it up and went fishing. Came back here yesterday and realized we needed to have it stitched up and we needed to take some precautionary measures because we didn’t want to risk infection.”

Peavy said he came to the ballpark wanting to play catch, but the medical staff told him no.

“That’s the biggest thing. I could go out and play today if it was a must, but you can’t risk infection and let it sweat right off the bat. You don’t want to get it infected, that’s the reason you hold back a day or so,” he said.

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Peavy, however, doesn’t think this will be a long-term problem.

“I don’t think it’s going to be long at all. I’d like to go out there and play catch tomorrow. The biggest thing is not to sweat a whole bunch until the healing process takes over.

“I want to play catch. I’d like to be able to tell you I’ll be making my next start. Hopefully we can do that and get back on schedule so we don’t mess things up too much,” he said.

Peavy said the wound was on the outside part of the knuckle.

“It was a brand new knife and it was huge as well. It was new and big, so it was pretty sterile, but it was pretty sharp as well,” he said.

Peavy seemed to be able to laugh it off.

“We’ve all done something like that at some point in our lives. It was a huge bummer but so blessed it was my left hand. A bummer to miss a start and get off schedule a little,” he said.

Peavy said he wasn’t sure how many stitches were put in because he didn’t watch.

“They couldn’t stitch it all the way up. I guess you risk more infection by doing that. We had just got the arm in shape and built up. I threw 46 pitches the other day and was going to be throwing two innings today. As long as we can get going in the next couple of days, the last thing you want to do is alter someone else’s schedule,” he said.

As for the impact of receiving throws, Peavy is a little concerned.

“That’s gonna be the kicker. It’s on a knuckle. We’ll figure it out. Get a bigger glove or something. I’m sure they’ll wrap it up and get it to the point where I’ll watch it all the way, like I tell my boys, and make sure the ball goes into the pocket of glove,” Peavy said.

Peavy said the fish weren’t biting that day.

“No, we didn’t catch anything, but I might have got dad of the year votes on that one. I promised my 5-year-old we’d go fishing and that’s why I didn’t seek attention. My older two come with me (to the ballpark), but I leave him (the five year old). We had about a hour before dark. I couldn’t tell my 5-year-old I couldn’t go fishing. It was his last day here,” he said.

Peavy had been held back early in camp when he suffered an irritation of the right ring finger when he was struck by a ball.

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