You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Season officially over for Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid

Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid (54) had a rough run of injuries this season. Elise Amendola/Associated Press

Elise Amendola/Associated Press

Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid (54) had a rough run of injuries this season.

Adam McQuaid’s season officially ended Sunday, as the Bruins released a statement saying that the defenseman had undergone arthroscopic surgery on his right ankle Thursday. The expected recovery time is eight weeks.

The origin of the ankle injury is unclear, though McQuaid has suffered through lower-body injuries throughout the season, and it could have come from overcompensating from the initial injuries. The ankle situation did not pop up recently, according to a team source.

Continue reading below

The surgery might mark the end of McQuaid’s tenure with the Bruins. He has been replaced by Kevan Miller as the third-pairing defenseman with Torey Krug, and McQuaid and Miller have similar skill sets. Miller is signed for two more seasons at $800,000 per year.

McQuaid’s biggest problem always has been that he hasn’t been able to consistently stay on the ice. He has had a slew of injuries in his time in Boston, ranging from a blood clot to a shoulder injury to the ankle surgery. He is signed for one more year at a cap hit of $1,566,667.

“It’s not easy for anyone to go through,” McQuaid said back in late February. “I think I’m lucky, I think I’ve been in the right mind-set right now to go through something like this. I’ve stayed really positive with it. Again, it’s a tough situation, but I control what I can.

“Every time I’ve come back I’ve hoped that that was going to be the end of it, but it’s hockey and things happen and so it goes in life.”

McQuaid ended up playing just 30 games this season, two fewer than he played in the lockout shortened 2012-13 season.

He suffered lower-body injuries Nov. 9, Nov. 30, and Jan. 19, and was called day-to-day at that point, and it was believed that he would return to the ice soon after the resumption of play after the Olympic break. He never did.

The Bruins announced that the defenseman had been shut down for 2-3 weeks on March 5 with a quad strain, and he returned to the ice April 9. He was last seen on the ice April 19, skating before practice with Daniel Paille and strength and conditioning coach John Whitesides.

Amalie Benjamin can be reached at abenjamin@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @amaliebenjamin.
Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.