Sports

Jermaine Kearse evoked flashbacks to David Tyree’s helmet catch

Glendale, AZ - 2-1-15 - Super Bowl XLIX - NE Patriots - Seattle Seahawks - Seahawk Jermaine Kearse makes a circus catch end of 4th quarter as Malcolm Butler looks on from ground. (Matthew J. Lee) / Globe staff)

Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

Receiver Jermaine Kearse grabbed a tipped pass before it hit the ground to set the Seahawks up in the red zone on their final drive.

When Seahawks receiver Jermaine Kearse made a most unlikely catch late in the fourth quarter of Super Bowl XLIX, many had flashbacks to two other miraculous Super Bowl catches that helped prevent the Patriots from winning.

The most common flashback was to Super Bowl XLII after the 2007 season when the Giants’ David Tyree pinned the ball against his helmet to sustain New York’s game-winning drive. That play came on the same field as Sunday’s game in Glendale, Ariz.

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At his Super Bowl MVP press conference Monday, Patriots quarterback Tom Brady described his reaction to Kearse’s catch.

“I kind of turned away,” said Brady. “I saw Malcolm [Butler] make a great play and he tipped it, and I turned my head, and then the guy got up and started running, and I said ‘what happened?’ I saw the review, and couldn’t believe it.

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“I felt like we were going to win the whole game, and then they made that catch, and then I had a little bit of doubt, and then we made a great play. We’ve been on the other end of some great catches, and not being able to finish it out, so this time we made the play.”

The Giants also benefited from a dazzling catch by Mario Manningham in Super Bowl XLVI after the 2011 season. Manningham’s 38-yard reception keyed a game-winning drive that started at New York’s 12.

Compare the Kearse and Tyree catches:

Kearse

Tyree

Follow Matt Pepin on Twitter at @mattpep15.
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