Assistant Chief Photographer

Lane Turner

Turner is a features picture editor. He is one of the editors of The Big Picture, edits the Big Shots sports photographer blog, and produces video projects, all for Boston.com. He has been a staff photographer at the Globe since 1989.

Latest stories

Portraits

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A portrait often pauses events and allows viewers to look into the eyes of the participants. Candid moments are usually how stories are told, but sometimes the interaction between photographer and subject tells its own story. Like a movie character who breaks the fourth wall, a portrait can arrest our gaze when we’re otherwise focused on narrative, forcing us to consider an individual. Collected here is a celebration of that special genre of photojournalism, the portrait.

Monochrome

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Some of the best photographs in color make no attempt to utilize the entire available palette. A splash of just one hue can crystalize a moment or a mood in a way that a full spectrum often cannot. Sometimes black and white photography simplifies a chaotic world, stripping away distractions to focus on the subjects at hand. This isn’t necessarily true all the time, and there are many reasons for creating images in black and white. The monochrome image as well gives photographers that same distillation of intent that black and white can achieve, and still allows for the vibrant saturation of real life. Collected here are images that celebrate the primarily monochrome vision.

Times Square

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Opinions vary on the transformation of Times Square from seedy to touristy, but the changes seen in the last decade were not the first, nor will they be the last, to the so-called crossroads of the world. Perhaps the tourist-friendly metamorphosis was inevitable given the onslaught: Times Square is arguably the most visited place on the planet. Though counting unticketed crowds must be an inexact science, by most measures the intersection of Broadway and 42nd Street and the surrounding neighborhood is at or near the top of any destinations list. Crowds of half a million or more for popular events are not unheard of, and daily visits to the square run to around a third of a million. Once the heart of New York’s carriage industry, the area has changed with the city, but is always a character itself in the drama of unfolding life in Manhattan.

From the Archives

From Globe archives: Paragon Park

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Paragon Park was part of Hull’s Nantasket Beach for more than 100 years. A fire destroyed much of the park in 1963, but it came back as strong as ever. The park finally closed in 1985.