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Picture emerges of a troubled family life in Blackstone

Some 150 people gathered at dusk Sunday at a field in Blackstone, the town where authorities found the remains of three infants in a squalid house last week. A pastor asked for prayers not just for the infants, but also for four children taken from the house earlier and for their mother, who has been characterized as deeply troubled.

The decontamination of the home was taking longer than expected because of the amount of hazardous waste within.

 

Baker, Coakley steer clear of far-reaching tax talk

Gubernatorial candidates Martha Coakley (left) and Charlie Baker

Gubernatorial candidates Charlie Baker and Martha Coakley are treading cautiously when it comes to the charged issue.

 

Many yet to be persuaded in Mass. governor’s race

At the Heritage Coffee Shoppe in Auburn, politics is often on diners’ plates. Sixty percent of voters in the Central Massachusetts town are unlisted.

Choosing the next governor can take a while when the choices are coming out of 2010’s recycling bin.

 

Schools’ wait lists called a drag on the economy

A machinist at AccuRounds in Avon, which has a labor shortage that vocational schools could help eliminate.

Long lists for vocational and tech schools are creating a bottleneck in training as thousands of jobs go unfilled.

 

Two hospitals team up to aid domestic violence victims

Melissa Dohme, who was stabbed 32 times in 2012, got help from Dr. Tessa Hadlock at Mass. Eye and Ear.

An unusual partnership between Mass. Eye and Ear and Mass. General provides free or lower-cost treatment for victims.

 

Double Shot

At a White House rich in coffee lore, no word on president’s preference

Caffeine consumption in the West Wing has, apparently, become a state secret.

It turns out that the Obama White House makes it nearly impossible to find the source of its coffee and how it is prepared.

 
 

Globe Insiders

 
 

Harmony in Vermont

A naturalized and sculpted landscape on the shores of Lake Champlain.

 
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The Nation

 

Double Shot

At a White House rich in coffee lore, no word on president’s preference

Caffeine consumption in the West Wing has, apparently, become a state secret.

It turns out that the Obama White House makes it nearly impossible to find the source of its coffee and how it is prepared.

 

Hillary Clinton in Iowa stirs 2016 speculation

Hillary Rodham Clinton implored Democrats on Sunday to choose shared economic opportunity over ‘‘the guardians of gridlock’’ in a high-profile appearance.

 

Search pressed for killer of Pennsylvania trooper

A state trooper and other authorities investigated a wooded area across from the police barracks in Blooming Grove, Pa., after a trooper was fatally shot.

Investigators on Sunday returned to scour the woods across from a State Police barracks where two troopers were ambushed.

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The World

 

Arab nations offer military role in Mideast

Several Arab countries have offered to carry out airstrikes against militants from the Islamic State, if the missions are approved by Iraq.

 

6 dead in fighting in Ukraine

Volunteers shared food and water for residents in the eastern Ukraine town of Luhansk on Sunday.

Heavy fighting broke out Sunday between Ukrainian and rebel forces on the north side of Donetsk, killing at least six people.

 

Cameron announces response plan to beheading of British aid worker

After an emergency meeting Sunday, Prime Minister David Cameron laid out a plan to support US military action in Syria and Iraq.

 
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Editorial & Opinion

 

Alan M. Dershowitz | Part 2

Surveillance and privacy

The case of NSA leaker Edward Snowden reveals a program with few checks and little accountability.

 

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Legislative session about nothing, or pure comedy gold?

Try as they may to avoid it, members of Congress will have to do a little something during their session about nothing.

 

editorial

Boston police wisely jettison outmoded civil service exams

The new promotional exam for Boston police officers is designed to assess a candidate’s experience, judgment, honesty, and work ethic in addition to the knowledge of criminal law, police procedures, and departmental regulations.

The new test will be well worth the price if the most experienced and well-rounded officers rise through the ranks.

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Metro

 

Many yet to be persuaded in Mass. governor’s race

At the Heritage Coffee Shoppe in Auburn, politics is often on diners’ plates. Sixty percent of voters in the Central Massachusetts town are unlisted.

Choosing the next governor can take a while when the choices are coming out of 2010’s recycling bin.

 

Two hospitals team up to aid domestic violence victims

Melissa Dohme, who was stabbed 32 times in 2012, got help from Dr. Tessa Hadlock at Mass. Eye and Ear.

An unusual partnership between Mass. Eye and Ear and Mass. General provides free or lower-cost treatment for victims.

 

Baker, Coakley steer clear of far-reaching tax talk

Gubernatorial candidates Martha Coakley (left) and Charlie Baker

Gubernatorial candidates Charlie Baker and Martha Coakley are treading cautiously when it comes to the charged issue.

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Business ǀ Science

 

Schools’ wait lists called a drag on the economy

A machinist at AccuRounds in Avon, which has a labor shortage that vocational schools could help eliminate.

Long lists for vocational and tech schools are creating a bottleneck in training as thousands of jobs go unfilled.

 

Startup tackling helmet flaws

 Scott Simonson of the Oakland Raiders lost his helmet when he was hit by a Detroit Lions opponent.

Fledging company HeadSmart Labs is rethinking some of the ways that football players’ protective gear is used.

 

Often, auto safety unit is slow to act

In 2005, Jessica Cruickshank experienced repeated incidents of her 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix shutting off during driving.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has a record of missteps.

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Obituaries

 

Leonard Fein, at 80; illuminated roles of America’s Jews

Cofounding the magazine Moment in the 1970s, Dr. Fein became one of the nation’s most visible writers and thinkers about Jewish ideas and issues.

 

Joe Sample, 75; pianist was pioneer in fusion of jazz, funk

Mr. Sample’s band, Jazz Crusaders, sought to synthesis such genres as electronic funk, pop music, and jazz.  As a studio musician, he worked with B.B. King, Marvin Gaye, and others.

Mr. Sample was a founding member of the genre-crossing Jazz Crusaders who helped pioneer the electronic jazz-funk fusion style.

 

James Rees, at 62; keeper of George Washington’s legacy

Mr. Rees was president of George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate in Virginia for almost two decades.

Mr. Rees spent nearly his entire career at Mount Vernon, and for nearly two decades was the president of the founding father’s estate.

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Sports

 

Ben Volin | On football

Patriots defense was good, but bigger tests await

The Patriots defense had six sacks of the Vikings’ Matt Cassel Sunday, and hurried him most of the day. Barry Chin/Globe Staff

Let’s not get too crazy about the Patriots’ defensive dominance — without Adrian Peterson, there wasn’t much punch in the Vikings offense.

 

RED SOX 8, ROYALS 4

Red Sox beat Royals, take three of four in series

Daniel Nava hit a grand slam in the sixth inning Sunday to help the Red Sox beat the Royals.

The Red Sox (66-84) are off Monday and continue their trip on Tuesday night in Pittsburgh.

 

Patriots 30, Vikings 7

Patriots rebound with resounding victory over Vikings

Julian Edelman caught a 9-yard touchdown pass from Tom Brady in the second quarter.

After losing their season-opener, the Patriots dominated in Minnesota to even their record at 1-1.

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G: Health

 

Taking a pill to prevent HIV

Jason Roush, an EmersonCollege instructor who is gay, is among those who have decided against taking the drug, despite the recommendations. “I worry about potential toxicity. I don’t want to put any medication into my body unless it’s something I absolutely have to take.”

Concerns and stigma remain about a new drug meant to protect against HIV infections, leading some gay men to hold off despite recommendations.

 

Fripp plays favorites with a new King Crimson

From left: Tony Levin, Gavin Harrison, Mel Collins, Bill Rieflin, Robert Fripp, Pat Mastelotto, Jakko Jakszyk.

The first band to tour under the King Crimson name since 2008, the unorthodox septet plays the Colonial Theatre on Monday and Tuesday.

 

Album review | Country

Tim McGraw, ‘Sundown Heaven Town’

McGraw follows up 2013’s “Two Lanes of Freedom” with the pleasant if more conventional “Sundown Heaven Town,” out Tuesday.

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Comics

Crossword

Circulars

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