Front page

Ex-headmaster’s staff say problems were known

Rodney Peterson, the Boston headmaster allowed to keep his job after assaulting his wife, was chronically absent from work and struggling with personal bankruptcy.

Convention center authority to buy site for hotel

The deal is the first step toward a massive expansion of the sprawling convention complex, according to a person with knowledge of the deal.

South Boston priest faces child porn charges

A 39-year-old Roman Catholic priest was arrested for allegedly having pornographic images of children on his computer.

Parents root, agonize on the sidelines at Olympics

Competition can be just as stressful for parents as it is for athletes. Just ask the parents of Needham gold medalist Aly Raisman.

NBC’s roving parent cam captured the angst of Needham residents Lynn and Rick Raisman as they watched daughter Aly on Sunday.

NBC Universal

NBC’s roving parent cam captured the angst of Needham residents Lynn and Rick Raisman as they watched daughter Aly on Sunday.

The Raismans continued to shift in their seats while Aly competed.

NBC Universal

The Raismans continued to shift in their seats while Aly competed.

The tense couple's synchronized squirming mimicked their daughter's moves on the floor.

NBC Universal

The tense couple's synchronized squirming mimicked their daughter's moves on the floor.

On Sunday, US gymnast Jordyn Wieber’s mother, Rita, cheered her on.

NBC Universal

On Sunday, US gymnast Jordyn Wieber’s mother, Rita, cheered her on.

Clutching a South African flag, Bert Le Clos watched his son, Chad, win the gold in the 200-meter butterfly.

NBC Universal

Clutching a South African flag, Bert Le Clos watched his son, Chad, win the gold in the 200-meter butterfly.

An official spoke with players from China and South Korea before the teams were disqualified from the badminton doubles competition.

Outcry over badminton teams trying to throw matches

In a highly unusual move, four Olympic badminton teams were disqualified in an episode that drew outrage from fans and was widely seen as an insult to the Olympic spirit.

The Nation

Stem cells offer evidence on cancer’s growth

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

Rare stem cells that evade cancer treatments may be responsible for the reappearance of tumors in patients, new research suggests.

Judge puts off ruling on mistrial in Peterson case

By MICHAEL TARM

The judge in the Drew Peterson murder trial adjourned early Wednesday and delayed a decision on declaring a mistrial. A legal drama erupted Wednesday after a state witness let slip testimony that defense lawyers claim irreparably tainted jurors.

Thief gets 125 years, killers far less

A man convicted of stealing a gun used in a murder was given 125 years in prison — about a century longer than the actual killers received after taking plea deals. Christopher G. Nichols, 27, was sentenced Tuesday for gun theft, trafficking in stolen property, being a felon in possession of firearms, and other crimes, The Spokesman-Review reported

The World

US and Israel intensify talks on Iran options

By Elisabeth Bumiller and Jodi Rudoren

Public statements and private communications from the Israeli leadership in recent weeks set off US concerns that Israel might be preparing a military strike on Iran, perhaps as early as this fall.

Twins sentenced in terrorism scheme

Identical twin brothers from Somalia have been sentenced to three years in prison in Britain for raising money to fund terrorism abroad, officials said.

Group alleges atrocities in Myanmar

A human rights group said government forces opened fire on crowds in a targeted campaign of violence during recent sectarian strife.

Editorial & Opinion

Juliette Kayyem

Fear the grid

An Indian man walked past cables and exposed wires at an electricity substation in New Delhi, India, Wednesday.

By Juliette Kayyem

India’s power outages this week are a cautionary tale about delayed government investments.

editorial

Lottery cheated the public in failing to curb Cash WinFall

Lottery officials allowed gambling companies to exploit one of its games to rake in millions but didn’t stop it because of increased ticket sales — despite the breach of public trust.

editorial

Farm belt senators should ease up on ‘Meatless Mondays’

An Agriculture Department employee newsletter that advocated vegetarian meals for a day caught the ire of the meat industry and Republicans from beef-producing states.

Metro

Ex-headmaster’s staff say problems were known

By James Vaznis and Andrea Estes

Rodney Peterson, the Boston headmaster allowed to keep his job after assaulting his wife, was chronically absent from work and struggling with personal bankruptcy.

South Boston priest faces child porn charges

Andrzej J. Urbaniak, 39, a priest at Our Lady of Czestochowa in South Boston charged with possession and dissemination of child pornography, spoke with his attorney, Jeffrey Denner, right.

By Brian Ballou and Martine Powers

A 39-year-old Roman Catholic priest was arrested for allegedly having pornographic images of children on his computer.

Legislature postpones extending statute of limitations for child sex abuse

By Stephanie Ebbert

The state House and Senate failed to reach consensus on the legislation, but advocates say the bill’s progress represents its best hope in a decade and remain optimistic.

More Stories

Middleborough

EEE-positive mosquitoes found in sample

By Melanie Dostis

Music Review

Country’s royalty tell stories behind lyrics

By Stephanie Steinberg

Names

Chris Matthews talks JFK with the Partnership, Inc.

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Aly Raisman earns raves from Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Steve Carell is just a nice guy

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Aviles goes back back back . . . to school

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Business

Convention center authority to buy site for hotel

By Casey Ross

The deal is the first step toward a massive expansion of the sprawling convention complex, according to a person with knowledge of the deal.

Right to Repair bill awaits Patrick’s signature

By D.C. Denison

The November ballot question may be irrelevant after legislators approved measure to require automakers to provide independent repair shops with codes needed to diagnose car problems.

Apartments, hotel proposed for South End

The proposed development is expected to draw pedestrian traffic, outdoor dining to a desolate area.

By Casey Ross

A New Jersey developer is proposing to build an 18-story apartment tower and hotel next to the former Boston Herald headquarters.

More Stories

Stocks surge, glitch blamed

By Nathaniel Popper

market mover

Allstate shares jump

Obituaries

Gore Vidal, 86, celebrated and debonair writer, commentator

Author Gore Vidal died from complications of pneumonia at age 86.

By Mark Feeney

Vidal, whose best-selling novels and witty, acidulous essays made him one of America’s best-known authors, died Tuesday at his home in Hollywood Hills.

George Slye, 81, cofounder of Mass. real estate power

GEORGE SLYE

By J.M. Lawrence

Mr. Slye, who cofounded Spaulding & Slye and was a past president of the Greater Boston Real Estate Board, died July 13 at his home on Lake Winnipesaukee in Tuftonboro, N.H.

R.G. Armstrong Jr., actor played tough guys; at 95

By Daniel E. Slotnik

Mr. Armstrong, a rough-hewed character actor known for playing sheriffs, outlaws, and other macho roles, died ­Friday at his home in Studio City, Calif.

Sports

Outcry over badminton teams trying to throw matches

An official spoke with players from China and South Korea before the teams were disqualified from the badminton doubles competition.

By Shira Springer

In a highly unusual move, four Olympic badminton teams were disqualified in an episode that drew outrage from fans and was widely seen as an insult to the Olympic spirit.

Biggest Olympic hurdle? Transportation

Special “Games Lanes,” reserved for VIPs, athletes, and media, have further angered London commuters.

By Shira Springer

London Olympic organizers knew transportation would be an issue when the Games started. And they’ve been right.

Bob Ryan

Times have changed for US men’s boxing

By Bob Ryan

Once, America sent heavyweights to the Olympics such as Cassius Clay, Joe Frazier, George Foreman, and Evander Holyfield. Now we just hope to win a bout or two.

More Stories

Tigers 7, Red Sox 5

Red Sox allow 3 homers to Tigers, can’t finish sweep

By Peter Abraham

Red Sox notebook

No decision on whether Josh Beckett is DL-bound

By Peter Abraham

PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK

Scuffles highlight Patriots practice session

By Shalise Manza Young

olympic medal events roundup

US diving bronze a long time in the making

OLYMPIC PRELIMINARIES ROUNDUP

Serena rises, Venus sinks in singles

Golf notes

Golf notes: Andy Drohen captures Mass. Publinx

By Michael Whitmer

Golf tip of the week

Golf tip: Tough spot to be in, any way you slice it

By Michael Whitmer

TEEING OFF

Fred Couples honored back in winner’s circle

By Michael Whitmer

Globe North

Doubling of MBTA shuttle fares strains disabled users

James Nowlan of Salem uses The Ride at his volunteer job at the Independent Living Center in Salem to travel to his home.

By G. Jeffrey MacDonald

The disabled are feeling an especially tight pinch from July’s MBTA fare increases. While average T fares rose 23 percent, users of The Ride now pay 100 percent more.

West Nile sparks action in seven communities

By David Rattigan

Seventeen samples tested positive for West Nile virus, leading health officials in seven Globe North communities to take action.

Amesbury

Battling cancer, Diane Legg tackles Pan-Mass Challenge

Diane Legg, who has lung cancer, is taking on her first Pan-Mass Challenge.

By Brion O’Connor

Legg, who is living with Stage IV lung cancer, will ride in her first Pan-Massachusetts Challenge Saturday, making the 84-mile trek from Bourne to Wellesley.

Globe South

Mass Audubon offers online guide to its wildlife sanctuaries

North River Wildlife Sanctuary in Marshfield.

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

The organization has created an online vacation guide to help visitors plan a weekend getaway or a day trip to one of its 50 wildlife sanctuaries.

Seven wildlife sanctuaries south of Boston

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

Seven Mass Audubon sanctuaries south of Boston, and what they offer.

Fourth lanes on Route 128 to open

By John Laidler

After four years of construction, the state plans to open newly built fourth lanes along the 5.7-mile stretch from Randoph to Route 109 in Westwood this fall.

Globe West

Newton struggles to keep villages vibrant

The Breadsong Bakery in Auburndale.

By Deirdre Fernandes

Newton’s 13 villages are a source of pride for local residents, but keeping all the mini-downtowns in these villages thriving has been a challenge.

Answer key for Newton’s villages quiz

Nonantum hosts the St. Mary of Carmen Festival.

Answer key for Newton’s villages quiz.

Framingham residents air complaints on aqueduct trail proposal

By Ellen Ishkanian

In the first public hearing on the subject, neighbors said they already are dealing with trash and intrusions on their privacy from people who are using the trails.