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Words warm, combative as GOP nominates Romney

Ann Romney (left) electrified the crowd with a 20-minute speech while  keynote speaker Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, rallied the party toward a path of hard decisions and hard work.

JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/AP (RIght)

On the day Mitt Romney was formally nominated, his wife, Ann, spoke of the softer side of her husband while keynote speaker Chris Christie rallied the party.

Paul Ryan worked hard at working the crowd in his first campaign, in 1998. He developed a reputation as a political charmer, with what some opponents call a cutthroat political instinct.

In his first run, Paul Ryan made lasting mark

As Paul Ryan prepares to accept the GOP nomination for vice president, an examination of his first race in Wisconsin underscores the type of candidate he would become.

The late Rabbi Howard Kummer, right, did not tell his children how he felt about life support machines.

Campaign aims to spur end-of-life conversations

The Conversation Project encourages open and honest discussions about how to live life at the end.

MassDOT University instructor Karen Coffey told transportation workers to do their best to empathize with customers.

David L Ryan / Globe Staff

Customer service ranks high on MBTA curriculum

At the flagship course at MassDOT University, students learn to put the “public” in public employee.

The Nation

Gulf Coast braces as Isaac makes landfall

Some people played near waters stirred up by Hurricane Isaac in New Orleans’ Lake Pontchartrain on Tuesday.

By Michael Kunzelman and Stacey Plaisance

Hurricane Isaac raked the Louisiana coast and headed for New Orleans late Tuesday, with brutal timing that made up for much of what it lacked in punch.

Colorado fund-raising efforts criticized

Relatives of a shooting victim consoled each other at a news conference.

By Dan Elliott

Families of some of the 12 people killed in the Colorado theater shooting are upset with the way the millions of dollars raised since the tragedy is being distributed.

Court reduces punitive damages in Tony Alamo case

By JEANNIE NUSS

A federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered punitive damages against an evangelist who ordered two boys to be beaten to be reduced from $60 million to $24 million. The US Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit upheld an additional $3 million award each for the two men, now in their 20s, who grew up in Tony Alamo’s ministries.

The World

Syrian rebels patch together an arsenal

A Free Syrian Army fighter dodged Syrian army bullets in Syria’s northwest city of Aleppo.

By C.J. Chivers

The ability to manufacture weapons has become critical for Syrian rebels as their battle continues against the Assad regime.

Israeli judge rules American’s bulldozer death accidental

Rachel Corrie died in 2003 after a military bulldozer in Gaza ran her over during a protest. She was a student at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash.

By Danielle Ziri and Jodi Rudoren

An Israeli judge ruled that the state bore no responsibility for the death of Rachel Corrie, the young American woman who was run over by a military bulldozer in 2003 during a protest.

Gaza may be unlivable by 2020, report says

Life may become harder for Palestinians like these girls in Gaza City if infrastructure is not improved, a UN report says.

By Isabel Kershner

Gaza may not be ‘‘a livable place’’ by 2020 unless intensive efforts are made to improve infrastructure and services, a United Nations report concluded this week.

Editorial & Opinion

derrick z. jackson

Mine killings echo old South Africa

A policeman fired at protesting miners outside a South African mine in Rustenburg on Aug. 16.

By Derrick Z. Jackson

In the worst state suppression of labor unrest in the 18 years of the “free” South Africa, police shot dead 34 workers and wounded 78 others.

Scot Lehigh

Mitt Romney: Image and reality

By Scot Lehigh

A guide to evaluating some of the assertions that are likely to be made at the Republican National Convention.

Jeff Jacoby

Rebooting the public image

By Jeff Jacoby

A theme pulsing through the GOP convention is that there are times when people should reverse themselves on significant political issues.

Metro

Customer service ranks high on MBTA curriculum

MassDOT University instructor Karen Coffey told transportation workers to do their best to empathize with customers.

By Eric Moskowitz

At the flagship course at MassDOT University, students learn to put the “public” in public employee.

Campaign aims to spur end-of-life conversations

The late Rabbi Howard Kummer, right, did not tell his children how he felt about life support machines.

By Kay Lazar

The Conversation Project encourages open and honest discussions about how to live life at the end.

Mass. residents with New Orleans ties wary of storm

Vonnie Ward moved to Dorchester after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans.

By Martine Powers

For those in the state with ties to Louisiana’s coast, Isaac’s approach to New Orleans recalls the dread they felt as Hurricane Katrina loomed seven years ago.

Business

Educational levels tied to area’s lower joblessness

By Katie Johnston

The Boston area’s highly educated workforce is a key reason that the region’s unemployment rate has fallen well below the national average, according to a study.

Fidelity promotes Abigail Johnson to No. 2 role

Fidelity’s Abigail Johnson spoke earlier this year to  the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce.

By Beth Healy

The promotion is the clearest sign yet that Johnson is on target to take over the Boston investment giant from her father.

Banks’ profits, lending rose in second quarter

By Todd Wallack

Banks in Massachusetts and nationwide continued to slowly put the housing bust and recession behind them during the second quarter.

Obituaries

John Cawthorne, 70, longtime educator, BC associate dean

Mr. Cawthorne taught all levels, from kindergarten on up.

By Kathleen McKenna

Mr. Cawthorne, who taught at every level from kindergarten to graduate school, was remembered as an advocate for students.

Malcolm Browne, 81; covered Vietnam War

By Richard Pyle and Ula Ilnytzky

Mr. Browne’s photos of a monk burning himself in protest in 1963 drew attention to events in South Vietnam.

Art Heyman, ex-Knick led Duke’s emergence; at 71

By Eben Novy-Williams

Mr. Heyman, whose recruitment by Duke University from a Long Island high school helped spark one of college basketball’s fiercest rivalries, has died.

Sports

Angels 6, Red Sox 5

Red Sox, Alfredo Aceves fall in the ninth inning

Red Sox reliever Alfredo Aceves walked off the field as the Angels celebrated their come-from-behind win.

By Peter Abraham

Fresh off his suspension, Aceves couldn’t convert a 2-inning save opportunity and allowed two runs in the 9th for his 8th blown save.

Dan Shaughnessy

For Red Sox, reality sets in now

By Dan Shaughnessy

We wanted the Sox to quit on 2012. They have, and their lineup, dotted with batting averages below . 230, reflects it.

Long putters stirring debate on PGA Tour

Carl Pettersson is one of many golfers now using a long putter.

By Michael Whitmer

The popularity and success of long putters is forcing golf’s governing bodies to weigh in on whether their unconventional length should remain legal.