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Drug defendants freed in lab scandal

Suffolk County judges have freed at least 11 defendants facing drug charges -- almost all with lengthy criminal records -- since early September, in the first wave of what could be thousands of cases compromised by the burgeoning scandal at the state drug lab. All of the defendants were in jail awaiting trial, but judges agreed to release them or drastically reduce their bail because evidence in their cases was analyzed by a chemist accused of altering test results and mishandling evidence.

In June, Terrence Gomes stepped down as head of Roxbury Community College after nine years.

Review shows RCC put students’ basic needs at risk

A body of evidence collected by the Globe indicates that Roxbury Community College spent thousands on administrative raises while scrimping on campus amenities.

A Globe test of 43 seafood samples from local markets found about 20 percent weighed less than indicated on their packages. Fish from Henry Gonsalves Co. (above) showed the most variance.

JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF

Sept. 23, 2012

A watered-down deal for seafood shoppers

It looked like another Market Basket bargain: a 1.5-pound bag of mackerel fillets for $3.69. But the package contained more than two ounces of ice. An enticing offer at Save-A-Lot turned out to be an even worse deal. Ice accounted for nearly three of the 19 ounces of squid tubes going for $3.79.

Little money from third-party political advocacy groups has flowed into the Senate race since Scott Brown and Elizabeth Warren in January pledged to keep such groups from advertising on their behalf.

Election spending on local TV surges

The amount spent on political advertising on Boston television stations is already significantly higher than it was for the entire 2008 campaign.

The Nation

Political Notebook

Obama works to hold Wisconsin standing

President Obama greeted supporters during a campaign rally on Saturday in Milwaukee.

President Obama worked Saturday to squash GOP aspirations for a resurgence of support in pivotal Wisconsin.

Conservative activist courts evangelical vote for Romney

Ralph Reed (center) has bounced back after his association with lobbyist Jack Abramoff hurt his reputation.

By Jo Becker

Ralph Reed, who turned the Christian Coalition into a powerful political force, is planning a get-out-the-evangelical-vote operation for Mitt Romney.

Demand for coal amid Asian energy boom threatens Montana ranches

By Mathew Brown

A fast-growing market in exporting coal to Asia has ranchers seeing their long-held fears about big mining companies become reality.

The World

Attacks against Libyan militias spur warnings

An armed Libyan man flashed the victory sign in front of a fire at the headquarters of the hard-line Islamist group Ansar al-Shariah on Friday in Benghazi, Libya.

By Maggie Michael

Residents of Benghazi, Libya’s second-largest city, warned Saturday of a “revolution” to get rid of armed militias and Islamic extremists.

Rebel group says it moved headquarters to Syria

By Anne Barnard

Commanders of the Free Syrian Army said they had moved their headquarters from Turkey into ‘‘liberated areas’’ inside Syria.

The World Today

5 Iraqi soldiers killed in roadside bomb explosion

Five Iraqi soldiers were killed in a roadside bomb explosion north of Baghdad on Saturday, Iraqi officials said.

Editorial & Opinion

Joanna Weiss

For vulnerable women, an oasis on which to depend

Pamela Brousseau has a cup of coffee at Women’s Lunch Place Thursday.

By Joanna Weiss

The Women’s Lunch Place serves a population of extreme need. And its location, in the basement of a church on Newbury Street, underscores the highs and lows of our society.

opinion | Jeff Jacoby

The ghosts of Jimmy Carter

President Jimmy Carter speaks in the East Room of the White House in 1978.

By Jeff Jacoby

Is it fair to compare President Obama’s foreign policy to former President Carter’s? The similarities were especially vivid after the murder of four Americans in Libya.

joan vennochi

A dizzy ride on the Romney-coaster

By Joan Vennochi

Mitt Romney is the master of his own campaign mess. He built it, and now he owns it.

More Stories

Tom Keane

Occupy, Menino, and getting results

By Tom Keane

letters | CONSIDERING NEW STANDARDS FOR TESTING

Challenge is to take classroom gains to a macro level

letters | CONSIDERING NEW STANDARDS FOR TESTING

Light shed on limits of typical testing format

letters | CONSIDERING NEW STANDARDS FOR TESTING

Measuring creativity is not a simple task

letters | CONSIDERING NEW STANDARDS FOR TESTING

MCAS results must be weighed against costs

letters | warren’s native american heritage revisited

Candidate’s lack of transparency is what’s at issue

letters | warren’s native american heritage revisited

Stop trying to denigrate Senate hopeful with this side issue

Metro

Drug defendants freed in lab scandal

By Andrea Estes and Scott Allen

Suffolk County judges have freed at least 11 defendants facing drug charges, almost all with lengthy criminal records, since early September, in the first wave of potentially thousands of cases.

Review shows RCC put students’ basic needs at risk

In June, Terrence Gomes stepped down as head of Roxbury Community College after nine years.

By Mary Carmichael

A body of evidence collected by the Globe indicates that Roxbury Community College spent thousands on administrative raises while scrimping on campus amenities.

Former mayor Ray Flynn adds voice to Senate race

Former mayor Ray Flynn stopped to talk to two local women while campaigning with Senator Scott Brown at Castle Island in South Boston yesterday.

By David Filipov

As US Senator Scott Brown and challenger Elizabeth Warren fight out one of the country’s most hotly contested races, Flynn has entered the conversation.

Money & Careers

Election spending on local TV surges

Little money from third-party political advocacy groups has flowed into the Senate race since Scott Brown and Elizabeth Warren in January pledged to keep such groups from advertising on their behalf.

By Erin Ailworth

The amount spent on political advertising on Boston television stations is already significantly higher than it was for the entire 2008 campaign.

Sept. 23, 2012

A watered-down deal for seafood shoppers

A Globe test of 43 seafood samples from local markets found about 20 percent weighed less than indicated on their packages. Fish from Henry Gonsalves Co. (above) showed the most variance.

By Jenn Abelson

Frozen fish from the supermarket often has an excess of ice — and consumers are paying the price.

Filene’s developers look to past for inspiration

The original 1912 Filene’s building.

By Casey Ross

Executives in charge of the $620 million Filene’s redevelopment in Boston say they will seek to bring back many of its original features.

More Stories

Innovation Economy

Formlabs may reshape things with low-cost 3-D printer

By Scott Kirsner

homes of the week

Fort Point area unit has soaring views (and ceilings)

By John R. Ellement

homes of the week

Arlington condo housed in elegant, converted Victorian

By Jenifer B. McKim

The Color of Money

IPhone calamities can mean costly replacements

By Michelle Singletary

Market Mover

Railroad says business slowing

By Tim Catts

Sports

Dan Shaughnessy

Are Ravens now a rival for the Patriots?

Rob Gronkowski was injured on this play against Patriots nemesis Bernard Pollard in the 2012 AFC championship game against the Ravens.

By Dan Shaughnessy

We don’t hate the Ravens or friendly Baltimore, but this is the best we can do if the Patriots are going to have any active rival in the AFC.

Sunday Football Notes

Steve Sabol captured Patriots for posterity

Steve Sabol, who died Tuesday at 69, was president and co-founder (with his father) of NFL Films, whose depiction of the game is one of the biggest reasons the sport ascended to the top of the American sports landscape.

By Greg A. Bedard

Years from now, when the Robert Kraft-Bill Belichick-Tom Brady dynasty is long over, a choice few NFL Films productions will serve as time capsules for an extended era of excellence.

Bob Ryan

Doc Rivers refreshed ahead of milestone

Doc Rivers is entering his ninth season as head coach of the Celtics.

By Bob Ryan

It might be hard to believe, but Rivers, in his ninth season, can become the longest-tenured Celtics coach ever outside of Red Auerbach.

More Stories

sunday baseball notes

Terry Francona may have interesting options

By Nick Cafardo

Patriots at Ravens

Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis hasn’t lost his edge

By Julian Benbow

Sunday Basketball Notes

Nuggets GM Masai Ujiri has made great strides

By Gary Washburn

ON SECOND THOUGHT

Texas town builds $60m high school football stadium

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Sunday Hockey Notes

NHL dark, but Jordan Caron hopes to shine in AHL

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Patriots at Ravens | 8:20 p.m. on nbc

A little extra spice tonight

By Shalise Manza Young

Revolution 1, Red Bulls 1

Last-second goal keeps Revolution streak alive

By Frank Dell’Apa

NFL Week 3 preview

By Jim McBride

Everett 19, St. John’s 7

Everett takes advantage of Prep’s mistakes

By Anthony Gulizia

Monomoy 26, St. Joseph’s Prep 14

Monomoy takes historic win over St. Joseph’s Prep

By Patrick McHugh

Phillips Exeter 34, Worcester Academy 13

Jonathan DiBiaso on target for Phillips Exeter

By Jason Mastrodonato

HS Football Roundup

Roundup: Shawsheen wins shootout with Cambridge

By Zac Vierra and Juan Rivera

Orioles 9, Red Sox 6

Alfredo Aceves gives it away to Orioles

By Peter Abraham

Red Sox Notebook

Red Sox honor minor league award winners

By Peter Abraham

NHMS NOTEBOOK

Greg Biffle lobbies for regular-season recognition

By Michael Vega and Amalie Benjamin

Notre Dame 13, Michigan 6

Te’o, Irish smother Michigan

harvard 45, brown 31

Treavor Scales tips Ivy opener toward Harvard

By Diana Nearhos

Ideas

Ideas

How to change a culture

By Leon Neyfakh

If you want to redirect the behavior of a crowd, here’s a tip: don’t be too idealistic about human nature.

ideas

Introducing the robo-author

By Chris Wright

In an age of computer-generated books, you can publish a work but not write a word of it.

The Word

Dear Apple: Stop the funnification!

By Ben Zimmer

Advertisers love coining words nearly as much as critics love skewering them.

More Stories

Uncommon Knowledge

Marry in doubt, divorce in haste

By Kevin Lewis

Brainiac

Paint a bird on it

By Joshua Rothman

Books

book review

‘Joseph Anton: A Memoir’ by Salman Rushdie

By John Freeman

In his singular memoir, the author reveals the new identity he assumed after becoming the target of an Islamic fatwa, and the sometimes unintentionally amusing moments of his life since then.

Prolific writer, fan of 19th-century novels

Ken Follett: Prolific writer, fan of 19th-century novels

Ken Follett said his library includes several different bibles.

By Amy Sutherland

Ken Follett sounds awfully relaxed on the phone from London for an author who managed to publish two 900-page plus historical epics in two years and is already elbow deep in the next.

book review

‘Between Heaven and Here,’ by Susan Straight

Susan Straight’s third novel opens with the murder of a beautiful prostitute.

By Buzzy Jackson

If there is one thing we learn from Straight’s storytelling, it’s that the past, present, and future are with us all the time.

Obituaries

Ted Smith, 71; orchestrated land conservation

As a smokejumper, Mr. Smith put out fires in Montana.

By J.M. Lawrence

A longtime resident of Cambridge, Mr. Smith parachuted into burning forests in Montana as a smokejumper and later led the Boston-based Kendall Foundation.

Edwin Wilson, CIA agent convicted as arms dealer

Mr. Wilson was convicted of smuggling explosives to Libya.

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Wilson, a tycoon and spy whose business empire existed as a cover for espionage, was arrested in 1982 on charges of selling Libya 20 tons of powerful explosives. He was 84.

Joshua Morse III; dean led desegregation at Ole Miss

JOSHUA MORSE III

By Douglas Martin

Mr. Morse, as dean of the University of Mississippi School of Law in the 1960s defied segregationist tradition by admitting the school’s first black students. He was 89.

Arts & Movies

64TH PRIMETIME EMMY AWARDS

Emmys: predictions and preferences

Giancarlo Esposito (left, with Ray Campbell), nominated for an Emmy in the category of supporting actor, drama, infused his “Breaking Bad” character, Gus Fring, with an understated, cold fury.

By Matthew Gilbert

“Mad Men” could make television history with another Emmy for best drama.

Smile and nod: Emmy hopefuls voice their picks

By Sarah Rodman

We caught up with a handful of Emmy nominees at the recent Television Critics Association press tour to talk about their nominations, what they think their chances might be, and, in some cases, who they would be happy to clap and smile politely for if they don’t win Sunday.

arts

Manchester-by-the-Sea native follows charmed path to stardom

Dakota Johnson and Nat Faxon in “Ben and Kate” on Fox.

By Sarah Rodman

If you ever question whether a single decision can alter the course of your life, take a look at the case of Nat Faxon.

Travel

Under steam or sail, amid puffins or whales, cruising the USA

Lime Kiln Lighthouse (1914) on San Juan Island in Washington is a landmark for Northwest cruises.

By Patricia Borns

You fly and drive across it, ski and hike it, but the country also has more than 25,000 miles of navigable waters accessible by small ships.

16 Vermont artists to show during Brattleboro studio tour

David Holzapfel of Applewoods Studio and Gallery shapes the base of a desk.

By Necee Regis

During the fourth annual Brattleboro-West Arts Open Studio Tour, many of the studios nestled in hollows and perched on Vermont hilltops will welcome visitors.

In Africa, a floating safari down the Chobe River

Passengers board the Zambezi Queen from a tender boat, returning to the 14-suite luxury vessel after a sunset cruise on the Chobe River, which here divides Botswana from Namibia in south central Africa.

By Sandra MacGregor

Dividing Botswana  from Namibia, the wildlife-rich river borders Botswana’s renowned Chobe National Park and is home to an astonishing density of both prey and predator.

Real Estate

Condo buyers getting that old feeling again — anxiety

 Zac Camann (right) spoke to agent Constance Cervone at an open house at 57 Burroughs St. in Jamaica Plain, where the turnaround time for condo sales is averaging 38 days.

By Jenifer B. McKim

After several down years during which they were in the catbird seat, prospective buyers in the Boston area now face having to act quickly while also not paying too much.

Old and new homes alike need careful inspection

NEW  HOUSE — During the home inspection, make sure the dishwasher and other shiny new appliances actually work and are properly hooked up.

By Jay Fitzgerald

Thinking of buying a newly built house? Check that the dishwasher has been hooked up. An older home? Make sure the attic doesn’t have critters.

Magazine

Globe magazine | Your Home

An uncluttered kitchen in a green Somerville condo

Federico Erebia’s new kitchen has a second sink and more counter space (where an eat-in area once was) and bamboo cabinetry he made, using materials that meet the development’s green standards.

By Christie Matheson

A physician/woodworker uses extra drawers and shelves designed to minimize clutter.

Your Home: Kitchens and Baths

Milton fantasy-game producers get extraordinary new kitchen

The color scheme is purposefully restrained, to stand the test of time; a red Le Creuset Dutch oven that the couple owns influenced their choice of accent color.

By Marni Elyse Katz

When husband and wife game pros revamp their home kitchen, the result is something extraordinary.

The Guide

9 hot trends in kitchen design

By Elizabeth Gehrman

Thinking about renovating this important room? Designers share the latest news in cabinets, appliances, and more.

More Stories

Your Home: Kitchens and Baths

A bistro-style kitchen in Andover

By Jaci Conry

Your Home: Kitchens and Baths

The smartest bathroom window

By Jaci Conry

Your Home: Kitchens and Baths

Powder rooms go dramatic

By Marni Elyse Katz

Your Week Ahead

Five things to do this week

globe magazine

When everyone has everything

By Robin Abrahams

Soundtrack

The bell tolls at Cambridge City Hall

By Scott Helman

Out and About

As seen around town

Miss Conduct

Advice on visitors who don’t knock

By Robin Abrahams

Cooking

Recipes for fresh tomato soups

By Adam Ried

A Restaurant’s Take

Tomato soup at Garden at the Cellar

Dinner With Cupid

Now that’s amore!

Connections

Social networking for seniors

By Gary A. Kaplan

Tales From the City

Look! No hands!

Style Watch

Standout pants

By Tina Sutton

Globe North

Students visit Barack Obama’s old Somerville apartment

Ludgie Goin, 10, asked questions of Jay Holmes, Barack Obama’s former landlord, at 365 Broadway, Somerville.

By Matt Byrne

A field trip to the house where President Obama rented an apartment while he was at Harvard Law School student gave students a chance to connect with the man some consider their hero.

Q&A with a future president’s landlord

Some of the questions students asked Jay Holmes, President Barack Obama’s former Somerville landlord, and his answers.

Reading puts all records into online cloud

Reading Town Clerk Laura A. Gemme stands among stacks of old records being converted into online data.

By Brenda J. Buote

The sleepy suburb is emerging as a role model for small towns across the state by replacing stacks of manila folders and dusty filing cabinets with digital software.

Globe South

Norwood police, and other local units, connect via social media

Patrolman Andrew Jurewich updates and monitors the Norwood Police Department’s Facebook, Twitter, and Web pages.

By Natalie Feulner

This summer, multiple police departments south of Boston joined or ramped up their presence on one or two of the largest social media sites — Twitter and Facebook.

Twitter handles used by local police

Twitter user names for departments south of Boston.

For local Army couple, a ‘year to remember’

Mac Luciani and Karyn Sampson with their dog, Gemma, who was brought home from Afghanistan.

By Jessica Bartlett

After rescuing an abused puppy in Afghanistan, a Scituate couple is in the running for an all-expenses-paid wedding and honeymoon awarded to a military couple on Veterans Day.

Globe West

Concord man’s rescue mission brings monarchs into classroom

Thoreau Elementary students Sam Neville and Emma Sabin, backed up by teacher Susan Erickson, study a monarch caterpillar.

By Lisa Kocian

This summer, for the 16th year, Chris Randall rescued monarch eggs and raised the butterflies, eventually delivering his last two caterpillars to a fifth-grade class in Concord.

ideas

Wait, campaigns don’t work?

By Jesse Singal

They have a function, yes — but, political scientists are finding, it’s not usually to decide who wins the election.

Monarch butterflies fast facts

By Lisa Kocian

Here are some fun facts about monarch butterflies