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Harvard plans new arena, refurbished stadium, hotel

The university is readying a 10-year plan for Allston that will feature a basketball arena, a renovated football stadium, a hotel and conference center, and business school buildings.

Brock Callen (right) and Rob Douglas trained for the North American Speed Sailing Invitational, which will take place next week.

Kiteboarders make mark in sailing — quickly

Competitors will converge on Martha’s Vineyard for an event organized by local enthusiasts who also happen to be some of the fastest sailors on earth.

US rejects Mashpee Wampanoag casino deal

The Department of the Interior concluded an agreement for a casino planned for Taunton takes unfair advantage of the tribe.

Cathy Klim of Circleville, Ohio, intended to vote for President Obama but is now undecided.

Jay LaPrete for The Boston Globe

Battle for Ohio heats up

Mitt Romney seems to be making a renewed push to gain ground among women after President Obama’s lead slipped following his lackluster debate performance.

Brown backed letter on behalf of pharmacies

Scott Brown joined other senators in sending a letter advocating for the compounding-pharmacy industry, which is under scrutiny following a meningitis outbreak.

The Nation

Battle for Ohio heats up

Cathy Klim of Circleville, Ohio, intended to vote for President Obama but is now undecided.

By Alan Wirzbicki

Mitt Romney seems to be making a renewed push to gain ground among women after President Obama’s lead slipped following his lackluster debate performance.

Solar development plan OK’d

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said the plan was a roadmap for “faster, smarter utility-scale solar development.”

By Jason Dearen

Federal officials approved a plan on Friday that sets aside 445 square miles of public land in six Western states for the development of large-scale solar power plants.

Body in Colorado was missing girl’s

A body found in a suburban Denver park was identified Friday as that of a missing 10-year-old girl, authorities said.

The World

Violence returns to Cairo’s Tahrir Square

Protesters helped an injured man after scuffles broke out between groups of protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Friday.

By Aya Batrawy and Maggie Michael

Thousands of supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi clashed in Cairo’s Tahrir Square Friday in the first such violence since he took office.

Israeli paper says Netanyahu discussed peace with Syria through mediator

Netanyahu made an offer to return territory, the report said.

By Daniel Estrin

An Israeli newspaper reported Friday that Israel’s prime minister secretly talked peace with Syria through an American mediator, but negotiations ended because of the Syrian civil war.

Antigay attack injures 3 in Moscow

Masked men stormed a gay club, injuring three people in what independent monitors say was the seventh violent attack against gay people reported this year.

Editorial & Opinion

lawrence harmon

Reefer madness

By Lawrence Harmon

If medical marijuana truly relieves suffering, it belongs in pharmacies. Instead, Question 3 backers are pushing for the creation of up to 35 marijuana dispensaries across the state.

CARLO ROTELLA

School is renewed, but there’s hard work ahead

By Carlo Rotella

A school should look and smell like a place where young people and their teachers work hard because the stakes are high and because they owe it to themselves, each other, and the community.

Renée Loth

The GOP’s demographics problem

 Mitt Romney supporters recite the Pledge of Allegiance in Virginia.

By Renée Loth

If demographics is destiny, the Republican Party has a rendezvous with irrelevance — unless its policies change.

Metro

Harvard plans new arena, refurbished stadium, hotel

By Matt Rocheleau and Katherine Landergan

The university is readying a 10-year plan for Allston that will feature a basketball arena, a renovated football stadium, a hotel and conference center, and business school buildings.

Kiteboarders make mark in sailing — quickly

Brock Callen (right) and Rob Douglas trained for the North American Speed Sailing Invitational, which will take place next week.

By David Filipov

Competitors will converge on Martha’s Vineyard for an event organized by local enthusiasts who also happen to be some of the fastest sailors on earth.

Brown backed letter on behalf of pharmacies

By Noah Bierman and Frank Phillips

Scott Brown joined other senators in sending a letter advocating for the compounding-pharmacy industry, which is under scrutiny following a meningitis outbreak.

Business

Harvard Business School gets $40 million family donation

Dr. James Si-Cheng Chao sits next to a portrait of his late wife, Ruth Mulan Chu Chao. Four of their daughters attended Harvard Business School. From left, Angela, Elaine (a former US labor secretary), Christine (who did not attend the school), May, and Grace.

By D.C. Denison

The family of former US labor secretary Elaine L. Chao made the donation, which will be used to add a second executive education center.

Markey urges review of high gas prices

US Representative Edward J. Markey

By Erin Ailworth

US Representative Edward J. Markey called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether oil companies and refiners are manipulating prices.

Dunkin’ Donuts tries to trademark ‘Bagel Bunchkins’ in the US

By Todd Wallack

Dunkin’ Donuts took doughnut holes, called them Munchkins, and made them a hit. Can it work the same branding magic with bagel pieces?

Obituaries

Turhan Bey, 90; starred in Hollywood swashbucklers

Turhan Bey (on horse) in “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.”

By Dennis Hevesi

Turhan Bey, whose dark good looks, swept-back hair and soothing, Continental voice brought him fame in swashbuckling films of the 1940s, died in Vienna on Sept. 30.

Eda Mirsky Mann, painter, mother of novelist Erica Jong

Eda Mirsky Mann, a painter and designer and the mother of ‘‘Fear of ­Flying’’ novelist Erica Jong, has died. She was 100.

Andrew Brimmer, Federal Reserve Board member

ANDREW F. BRIMMMER

By Stephanie Strom

Dr. Brimmer, a sharecropper’s son who was the first black member of the Federal Reserve Board and who led efforts to reverse the country’s balance-of-payments deficit, has died at age 86.

Sports

Ninkovich making an impact for Patriots

Rob Ninkovich has two sacks and three forced fumbles in his last two games.

By Michael Whitmer

Rob Ninkovich’s inspired, improved play recently (two sacks and three forced fumbles) has coincided with the Patriots winning the last two games.

Red Sox open manager interviews

TIM WALLACH

By Peter Abraham

The Red Sox interviewed Dodgers third base coach Tim Wallach on Friday at Fenway Park and are scheduled to speak to Padres special assistant Brad Ausmus on Monday.

Kevin Garnett says Celtics’ versatility is encouraging

Kevin Garnett is having a ball playing with — and mentoring — new teammates.

By Frank Dell'Apa

Garnett says this year’s Celtics remind him of 2007-08 championship team.

More Stories

yankees 3, orioles 1

CC Sabathia leads Yankees to ALCS

By Peter Abraham

patriots notebook

Patriots’ Hernandez questionable for Sunday

By Michael Vega

Natick 42, Weymouth 23

Natick trumps Bay State rival Weymouth, 42-23

By Anthony Gulizia

King Philip 43, Sharon 0

King Philip proves to be superior, beating Sharon

By Zac Vierra

cardinals 9, nationals 7

Cardinals rally, stun the Nationals

By Howard Fendrich

Stoughton 12, North Attleboro 7

Baugh spurs Stoughton past North Attleboro

By Jason Mastrodonato

Beverly 30, Masconomet 14

Flaherty helps Beverly run past Masconomet

By Patrick McHugh

Wayland 10, Lincoln-Sudbury 6

Wayland throws Lincoln-Sudbury for a loss

By Andy Deossa

High School Football Roundup

Vincent Burton leads Blue Hills past Southeastern

By Eric Russo

School Roundup

Lincoln-Subury remains undefeated in girls’ soccer

By Ayoub Kourikchi

BC at Florida St. | Saturday, 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2)

Talented Florida State next test for Boston College

By Julian Benbow

UMass 4, UConn 1

New UMass hockey coach aims for change

By Fluto Shinzawa

G: Family

g cover

‘The Silent History’ invites readers to become active participants

By Eugenia Williamson

“The Silent History,” an exquisitely designed serialized work of literary fiction, is ostensibly an e-book, but it’s wholly unlike any you’ve seen before.

‘The Silent History,’ step-by-step

A step-by-step guide to a new immersive e-book.

From the Archives

From the Archives: Chelsea fire of 1973

Chelsea was on fire again. Already the scene of one of the biggest fires in the history of the country in 1908, the city was engulfed anew on October 14, 1973.

More Stories

bOOK rEVIEW

‘Blasphemy’ by Sherman Alexie

By Eric Liebetrau

Love Letters

She wants to convince him to have kids

By Meredith Goldstein

Bring the Family

Wolf Hollow in Ipswich

By Milva DiDomizio

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Patrick Wolff

Movie Stars

Movie stars

Names

Kennedy golf tournament draws the stars

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Alton Lane opens on Newbury Street

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Sneakers and Traci Bingham at Emerald Lounge

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

names

Bill Belichick sells Brooklyn townhouse

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Celebrity news

Octomom off the hook