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Elizabeth Warren was in Springfield Monday, while Scott Brown appeared in North Andover.

AP (left); SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF

Senate foes hone tactics as race enters stretch run

Senator Brown and Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren are looking to rally supporters and lure independents in the final two weeks of the campaign.

Governor Patrick said he was troubled by the way the state monitored the New England Compounding Center.

State to review pharmacy monitoring

In 2006, the Framingham facility at the center of the nationwide meningitis outbreak was inspected by an Illinois firm whose CEO was, at the time, facing fraud charges.

On a recent Sunday, Sean Kennedy watched NFL on TV, while Kimberly and Theo studied fantasy stats.

Fantasy football gaining in popularity with kids

Today almost 3.5 million kids play and their numbers are growing as the sport charms a football-obsessed nation.

The Nation

Laying out 2 visions for US role in final debate

Mitt Romney and President Obama were expected to stick to foreign policy but often drifted off topic to domestic economic issues on Monday night.

By Brian MacQuarrie and Matt Viser

President Obama and Mitt Romney nodded to areas of agreement, but still found plenty of ways to disagree over US foreign policy and approaches in the Middle East.

Presidential debate | News Analysis

Goals are similar, but styles differ

President Obama and challenger Mitt Romney agreed on many foreign policy issues in Monday’s debate.

By Christopher Rowland and Bryan Bender

On the most substantive foreign policy questions, Mitt Romney had trouble explaining what he would do differently from President Obama.

Texas school districts assail state over financing

Lawyers representing Texas school districts spoke Monday in state District Judge John Dietz’s courtroom in Austin.

By Will Weissert

Attorneys representing around 600 school districts argued that the Texas school financing system is so ‘‘hopelessly broken’’ that it violates the state Constitution.

The World

War tide awash at Syria borders

Wounded Syrians were moved to a truck headed for the hospital after Syrian regime forces attacked in Aleppo Monday.

By Jodi Rudoren and Ranya Kadri

Jordan and Lebanon moved aggressively Monday to squelch the spread of violence from Syria’s deadlocked civil war.

3 British men go on trial over alleged terror plot

The three young British Muslim men are accused of plotting to set off bombs that prosecutors say could have been deadlier than the 2005 London transit attacks.

Clintons land in Haiti to showcase industrial park

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton encouraged foreigners to invest in Haiti as she and her husband helped inaugurate an industrial park at the center of efforts to rebuild after the 2010 earthquake.

Editorial & Opinion

Joanna Weiss

The humor vote

By Joanna Weiss

This election cycle, the most potent political weapon might turn out to be not fear, but a certain brand of subversive online jokes.

farah stockman

Mitt Romney: Yeah, what he said

By Farah Stockman

It was striking how many times Romney agreed with President Obama’s policies on Afghanistan, sanctions on Iran, and the decision not to use the US military in Syria.

juliette kayyem

A night to woo women voters

By Juliette Kayyem

Mitt Romney’s pivot to a kinder/gentler candidate bumped up against his record of statements; his performance seemed more passive than pacifist.

Metro

State to review pharmacy monitoring

Governor Patrick said he was troubled by the way the state monitored the New England Compounding Center.

By Liz Kowalczyk and Kay Lazar

In 2006, the Framingham facility at the center of the nationwide meningitis outbreak was inspected by an Illinois firm whose CEO was, at the time, facing fraud charges.

Senate foes hone tactics as race enters stretch run

Elizabeth Warren was in Springfield Monday, while Scott Brown appeared in North Andover.

By Noah Bierman

Senator Brown and Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren are looking to rally supporters and lure independents in the final two weeks of the campaign.

4 Pittsfield men charged with rape of UMass student

From left: Justin King, 18; Emmanuel Bile, 18; Caleb Womack, 17; and Adam Liccardi, 18; all of Pittsfield, were arraigned Monday in Eastern Hampshire District Court.

By Alyssa Creamer and Travis Andersen

UMass Amherst officials were reaching out to students and assuring them of their safety after an 18-year-old woman reported being gang-raped in her dormitory room.

Business

US pressed to release heating aid

By Erin Ailworth

Attorney General Martha Coakley is urging federal officials to help needy families pay to heat their homes by releasing billions in government funds.

Seaport District gets another restaurant invasion

75 on Liberty Wharf held a family and friends evening before opening to the public. The restaurant is in a 1,500-square-foot glass kiosk on Boston Harbor.

By Kathleen Pierce

The latest influx involves some of the biggest names in Boston’s food scene, with options that range from neighborhood tavern, to French bistro, to gourmet grocer.

RBS under pressure to sell Citizens group

By Todd Wallack

For the second time in three months, speculation is swirling that the ailing Royal Bank of Scotland may have to sell its US subsidiary, Citizens Financial Group, to raise money.

Obituaries

Russell Means, Indian activist and actor, dies at 72

Mr. Means’s theatrical protests brought national attention to poverty and discrimination suffered by his people.

By Robert D. McFadden

Mr. Means, the charismatic Oglala Sioux who used guerrilla-tactic protests to call attention to injustices against indigenous peoples, died Monday.

Ron Baglio, 42; assistant headmaster at Eagle Hill School

Though he carried out disciplinary duties, Mr. Baglio could put students and staff at ease.

By Bryan Marquard

During 18 years at the school in Hardwick, Mr. Baglio was the school’s chief disciplinarian, and also the person many students turned to for advice on all manner of topics.

Alfred Kumalo, photographer who depicted apartheid

ALFRED KUMALO

By Rodney Muhumuza

Mr. Kumalo, a South African photographer whose work chronicled the brutalities of apartheid and the rise of Nelson Mandela, died in Johannesburg. He was 82.

Sports

Patriots defense has no answers for big plays

Good pass defense starts with the front seven, and Chandler Jones and the Patriots still do not seem to be getting consistent pressure on opposing quarterbacks.

By Shalise Manza Young

While the secondary is in the spotlight for the breakdown, blame must also fall on the line for its recent lack of pressure.

Patriots notebook

Rob Ninkovich praised for his strip-sack, recovery

Patriots defensive end Rob Ninkovich combined with Jermaine Cunningham on a 15-yard sack in overtime.

By Michael Vega

Coach Bill Belichick lauded the instinctive play of the defensive end at the end of the Patriots’ 29-26 overtime victory over the Jets.

Mike Aviles reflects on his time with Red Sox

“I was shocked,” Mike Aviles said, on learning about his trade to the Blue Jays. “I had to just process everything at first . . . I’m pretty excited about it.”

By Peter Abraham

Traded to the Blue Jays, Aviles said the infamous spring incident with Bobby Valentine affected his teammates more than it did him.

G: Living

G cover

Take our Boston Book Festival personality quiz

(Left to right) Lizz Winstead, Richard Ford, and Joan Wickersham will all be featured at this year’s Boston Book Festival.

By Eugenia Williamson

Dazzled by the literati? Overwhelmed by workshops at the festival? Let this quiz be your guide to the 4th annual event.

Stage Review

‘Andrew Jackson’ a raucous ride through American history

Andrew Jackson (played by Gus Curry, left) takes on the Washington establishment (from left: Joshua Pemberton, Ben Rosenblatt, Tom Hamlett, and Ryan Halsaver) in SpeakEasy Stage’s “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.’’

By Don Aucoin

The musical satire “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson” is to standard presidential biography as a punch in the nose is to afternoon tea.

Stage Review

Listening and learning at Lyric’s ‘The Chosen’

Zachary Eisenstat (left) and Luke Murtha as Jewish teenagers in the 1940s in Lyric Stage Company’s “The Chosen.’’

By Jeffrey Gantz

The play follows two Jewish teenagers growing up in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn in the years 1944-48.

More Stories

Stage Review

Facing mortality in ‘Bengal Tiger’

By Don Aucoin

Photography review

Attempting to capture Grand Canyon’s grandeur

By Mark Feeney

Music Review

Sound Icon season opener pushes musical limits

By Matthew Guerrieri

Book Review

‘The Story of America’ by Jill Lepore

By Kate Tuttle

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Tuesday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Michael Andor Brodeur

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Names

Eva Mendes makes the scene in Rockport

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Douglas Kennedy trial starts in New York

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Carl Crawford’s house is yours for $2.9m

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Justin Bieber is big ticket item at Storybook Ball

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Jay Penske and his brother Mark sentenced

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Celtics doc talks sports; United Way hosts breakfast

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Celebrating 25 years of Steppin’ Out

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Tom Papa performs at National Braille Press benefit

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein