Front page

Unsanitary practices at pharmacy blamed in meningitis outbreak

Visible mold was found inside the Framingham pharmacy, including 83 vials from one lot of a tainted steroid used to treat back pain.

A bid for equity in school choice plan

A committee is weighing whether to give low-income students in Boston a priority to attend better-performing schools in other neighborhoods.

From left, Jill Stein, Rocky Anderson, Virgil Goode, and Gary Johnson took part in a third-party debate in Chicago.

Third-party candidates could tip vote

In hotly contested swing states, their presence on the ballot may alter the course of the election.

Hurricane Sandy, projected to make landfall early Tuesday near New Jersey, brings with it the threat of widespread flooding and power outages to much of the Northeast.

Mass. takes steps to contend with Sandy

The storm, which has killed at least 40 in the Caribbean, has the potential to pummel New England with torrential rain and high winds.

Rudolf Anderson

A pilot’s sacrifice helped defuse Cuban Missile Crisis

The death of pilot Rudolf Anderson, shot down over Cuba 50 years ago today, served as a catalyst for the US and the Soviet Union to cut a deal.

Actress Stephanie Perks monitored a video screen showing several views inside the Salem’s 13 Ghosts haunted house. She waits for a cue to jump and try to scare visitors.

More haunted houses turning to 3-D effects

Attractions have exploited technology — video effects, animatronics, visitor-tracking sensors — to put more fright into the night, 21st-century style.

The Nation

A pilot’s sacrifice helped defuse Cuban Missile Crisis

Rudolf Anderson

By Bryan Bender

The death of pilot Rudolf Anderson, shot down over Cuba 50 years ago today, served as a catalyst for the US and the Soviet Union to cut a deal.

Third-party candidates could tip vote

From left, Jill Stein, Rocky Anderson, Virgil Goode, and Gary Johnson took part in a third-party debate in Chicago.

By Tracy Jan

In hotly contested swing states, their presence on the ballot may alter the course of the election.

Satellite woes could hamper storm forecasts

By John H. Cushman Jr.

The United States is facing a year or more without crucial satellites that provide invaluable data for predicting storm tracks.

The World

Violence scattered during cease-fire in Syria

Despite a holiday cease-fire, a car bomb damaged this building Friday in Damascus, Syria.

By Hania Mourtada and Neil MacFarquhar

With the threat of violence diminished, protesters emerged onto the streets of cities and towns across the country.

France to pay for all abortions

France’s lower house voted Friday to fully reimburse all abortions and to make contraception free for minors.

Russian dissenter charged, released

Opposition leader Sergei Udaltsov was charged Friday with plotting mass disorder, but was unexpectedly allowed to remain free on his own recognizance.

Editorial & Opinion

Bob Levy| Farewell, Locke-Ober

Locke-Ober: Serving clients both famous and fussy

Longtime Locke-Ober employee Alfredo “Butch” Bartolizzi, right, talks with Paul Christopher of Haverhill, left, at the bar in December 1996. In its heyday, the restaurant was a magnet for celebrities as well as local politicians and writers.

By Bob Levy

On one of my first visits, I witnessed the restaurant’s eagerness to please its frequently prominent clientele.

George Frazier | Farewell, Locke-Ober

Women in the downstairs dining room? Egads!

Opened in 1875, Locke-Ober, which closed its doors last week, was the third-oldest restaurant in Boston.

By George Frazier

George Frazier, who died in 1981, was a Globe columnist. This is an excerpt from a column he wrote in 1973.

Martin F. Nolan | Farewell, Locke-Ober

A Globie morale boost, followed by a stick-up

By Martin F. Nolan

Outside the restaurant, we encountered two young men, each with pistols. “Throw your money on the ground,” they said.

More Stories

Robert Q. Crane | Farewell, Locke-Ober

A staple for celebrities and Beacon Hill

By Robert Q. Crane

John Sears | Farewell, Locke-Ober

Just the death of an institution, or more?

By John Sears

Micho Spring | Farewell, Locke-Ober

Some things best seen in the rearview mirror

By Micho Spring

letters | CONCUSSIONS PUT FOCUS ON YOUTH FOOTBALL

All coaches share duty to ensure kids’ safety

letters | CONCUSSIONS PUT FOCUS ON YOUTH FOOTBALL

Old football injuries found decades later in brain images

letters | A CRUNCHING OF NUMBERS IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE

‘Class warfare,’ all right — waged by the wealthy

letters | A CRUNCHING OF NUMBERS IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE

Gazing at gap between earned, ‘unearned’ income

letters | A CRUNCHING OF NUMBERS IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE

About that business experience of Romney’s . . .

Metro

Unsanitary practices at pharmacy blamed in meningitis outbreak

By Liz Kowalczyk and Kay Lazar

Visible mold was found inside the Framingham pharmacy, including 83 vials from one lot of a tainted steroid used to treat back pain.

Mass. takes steps to contend with Sandy

Hurricane Sandy, projected to make landfall early Tuesday near New Jersey, brings with it the threat of widespread flooding and power outages to much of the Northeast.

By Peter Schworm and Melissa M. Werthmann

The storm, which has killed at least 40 in the Caribbean, has the potential to pummel New England with torrential rain and high winds.

A bid for equity in school choice plan

By James Vaznis

A committee is weighing whether to give low-income students in Boston a priority to attend better-performing schools in other neighborhoods.

Business

Mass. economy slows as US growth picks up

By Megan Woolhouse

Massachusetts’ economic growth slowed significantly over the summer while the nation showed a modest pick-up, two reports show.

Foodmaster stores will become Whole Foods

Six Johnnie’s Foodmaster locations will be remodeled and reopen as Whole Foods stores by fall 2013.

By Jenn Abelson and Chris Reidy

Johnnie’s Foodmaster is closing six supermarkets in Massachusetts next month and selling the leases to Whole Foods.

State fines Citigroup $2m in case related to Facebook stock sale

By Michael B. Farrell

Massachusetts fined Citigroup for violating state securities law when it released confidential information about Facebook during the social media company’s troubled initial public offering.

Obituaries

Joanne Bluestone, 87; led Medicaid program in Mass.

JOANNE BLUESTONE

By Kathleen McKenna

Mrs. Bluestone was a former director of the state’s Medicaid program under Governor Michael S. Dukakis.

Eloy Gutierrez-Menoyo, 77; fought beside, against Castro

Eloy Gutierrez-Menoyo (far right) marched with Cuba leaders including Fidel Castro and Ernesto “Che” Guevara in 1960.

By Paul Haven

Mr. Gutierrez-Menoyo went from rebel commander fighting alongside Fidel Castro to a foe launching commando raids before settling inside Cuba as a moderate, prodialogue dissident.

Anita Bjork, actress in Bergman films

Ms. Bjork had a starring role in “The Lady in Black.”

By Bruce Weber

Ms. Bjork, 89, was a Swedish leading lady onstage and in films who starred in a celebrated screen adaptation of Strindberg’s ‘‘Miss Julie.’’

Sports

Can Patriots rise to the occasion?

Approaching the midway point of the season, Tom Brady called Sunday’s game against the Rams “critical.’’

By Shalise Manza Young

Approaching the midway point of the season, Tom Brady called Sunday’s game against the Rams “critical.’’

Christopher L. Gasper

Bill Belichick not a great NFL ambassador in England

Bill Belichick was the Dour of London on Friday as the Patriots arrived in England to play the Rams.

By Christopher L. Gasper

The Patriots coach looked and sounded as enthused as Kate Middleton caught in her knickers at a photography convention.

Dan Shaughnessy

Detroit’s a city worth rooting for

By Dan Shaughnessy

The slow-pitch softball Tigers have been silenced by the Giants so far. Their hungry, humble fans deserve better. Go Tigers. Go Detroit. Go Michigan.

More Stories

On baseball

Crawford gets a second chance in Los Angeles

By Nick Cafardo

patriots notebook

Aaron Hernandez among seven out for Patriots

By Shalise Manza Young

High School football

Proposal viewed as necessary change

By Andy Deossa

BU 5, UMass 2

BU pays tribute to Parker

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

Lincoln-Sudbury 14, Westford 7

Lincoln-Sudbury tops Westford in final minute

By Patrick McHugh

School Roundup

Andover girls’ swim team finishes undefeated again

By Ayoub Kourikchi

High school football roundup

Brockton upends Leominster, 14-6

By John McGuirk

Wakefield 42, Stoneham 28

Wakefield hands Stoneham first loss of football season

By Anthony Gulizia

Central Catholic 42, Lowell 34

Central Catholic holds off Lowell

By Zac Vierra

Duxbury 14, Hingham 7

Duxbury defeats Hingham, keeps streak alive

By Andy Deossa

BC 1, UMass-Lowell 0

Boston College hockey defeats UMass-Lowell

By Michael Vega

G: Family

From the Archives

From the archives: Cuban missile crisis 50 years ago

Fifty years ago, the world waited while the the United States and the Soviet Union bluffed and negotiated, a nuclear holocaust growing perilously real.

Music Review

Chan Marshall not quite at full Power

Chan Marshall as Cat Power performing in New York earlier this week.

By Sarah Rodman

At one time Chan Marshall, the woman behind the nom de indie rock Cat Power, was notorious for the wildly erratic nature of her live performances.

Positive thinking about negative campaigns

Nancy Purbeck is the founder of “Positive People Day.”

By Andrew Doerfler

Monday marks the 15th annual Positive People Day, a Boston tradition that encourages people to “commit to kindness.”