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Schools close, region preps for Sandy’s expected fury

Mike MacLelland II and his father boarded up his winter rental cottage on Turner Road in Scituate Sunday.

Hurricane Sandy is expected to begin thrashing Massachusetts with winds gusting to 80 miles per hour by Monday afternoon.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2012/10/29/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/2012-10-28T205449Z_01_LJJ004_RTRMDNP_3_STORM-SANDY.jpg States board up as Hurricane Sandy bears down

Big cities and small towns buttoned against the onslaught of a superstorm that could endanger 50 million people in the most heavily populated corridor in the nation.

State wants pharmacist to resign as a regulator

The lead pharmacist of a sister company to the pharmacy at the center of the meningitis outbreak has been asked to resign from the state board that oversees pharmacies.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2012/10/29/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/1401c6c1815349c1afbdd5f471dbe179-4856e82765284e1e1f0f6a706700880c--90x90.jpg Late moderate turn carrying Mitt Romney far

The more moderate tone and style Romney adopted in the presidential election’s closing weeks have boosted his once-flagging campaign.

On jobs, Senate rivals reflect the two-party split

Senator Brown and Elizabeth Warren largely mirror the basic divide between the GOP and Democrats on the role of government in putting people back to work.

Jeff Green bears heart surgery scar proudly

Green, out last year with the surgery, is silencing critics who thought the Celtics were foolish to re-sign him to a $36 million-dollar deal.

The Nation

Late moderate turn carrying Mitt Romney far

Mitt Romney spoke at a campaign event at the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio., as vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan and voters listened on.

By Matt Viser

The more moderate tone and style Romney adopted in the presidential election’s closing weeks have boosted his once-flagging campaign.

Court may take up key part of Voting Rights Act

Chief Justice Roberts has said that advance approval is a tough constitutional question.

By Jay Reeves

The Supreme Court could say as early as Monday whether it will consider ending a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

SpaceX capsule splashes into the Pacific

By Marcia Dunn

The unmanned space capsule completed the first official private interstellar shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA.

The World

China vows to drop plans for plant’s growth

A demonstrator held up a flier opposing plans to expand a petrochemical factory in the city of Zhejiang on Sunday

By Andrew Jacobs

Protests continued in the Chinese city of Ningbo even after the government vowed to cancel a petrochemical plant expansion.

Palestinians to seek UN recognition

By Mohammed Daraghmeh

The Palestinian president is moving forward with his plan to seek upgraded observer status at the United Nations next month.

British rocker arrested in sex abuse inquiry

By Sylvia Hui

Police investigating child sex abuse allegations against the late BBC TV host Jimmy Savile arrested former glam rock star and convicted sex offender Gary Glitter.

Editorial & Opinion

JULIETTE KAYYEM

US view of Cuba is stuck in the 1960s

By Juliette Kayyem

The Cuban Missile Crisis ended 50 years ago Sunday. But since that time, the relationship between the United States and Cuba has remained static.

JOHN E. SUNUNU

Simplify the tax code

By John E. Sununu

All it takes is a White House team that understands how Congress works, congressional leadership that wants to get it done, and a high tolerance for pain.

JAMES CARROLL

America’s kidnapped politics

By James Carroll

The nation’s politics have been kidnapped and dragged into the locked room where the nation’s economy lies languishing.

More Stories

editorial | ELECTION ENDORSEMENT

Barack Obama deserves another term

letters | on the venerable church organ

Instrument and its players earn respect, not scorn

letters | on the venerable church organ

Absurd display of culture-trashing

letters | on the venerable church organ

Quality of instrument, player can make all the difference

letters | on the venerable church organ

Organist sounds a bitter note

Metro

Schools close, region preps for Sandy’s expected fury

Mike MacLelland II and his father boarded up his winter rental cottage on Turner Road in Scituate Sunday.

By Bryan Marquard and Travis Andersen

Hurricane Sandy is expected to begin thrashing Massachusetts with winds gusting to 80 miles per hour by Monday afternoon.

State wants pharmacist to resign as a regulator

The Ameridose firm in Westborough and NewEngland Compounding Center share the same owners.

By Kay Lazar, Liz Kowalczyk and Todd Wallack

The lead pharmacist of a sister company to the pharmacy at the center of the meningitis outbreak has been asked to resign from the state board that oversees pharmacies.

On jobs, Senate rivals reflect the two-party split

By Noah Bierman

Senator Brown and Elizabeth Warren largely mirror the basic divide between the GOP and Democrats on the role of government in putting people back to work.

Business ǀ Science

Focus of Windows 8 is touch, not clicks

The new Windows 8 works better with touchscreen computers, which most of the world’s 1 billion Windows users do not have.

By Hiawatha Bray

Windows 8 is Microsoft’s most radical upgrade to Windows since the 1990s. To master it, users must learn new ways to interact with their computers.

Giving back to the electric grid

By Casey Ross

Boston will embark on a program to build energy-positive housing — homes that produce more electric power than they consume.

Partnerships viewed as crucial to charities

By Erin Ailworth

Many local social-services nonprofits are struggling to cultivate corporate support, a survey found.

Obituaries

Brooks Kelly, 77; lifelong artist was director of Plymouth County Development Council

Mr. Kelly, who helped found the Pembroke Arts Festival, painted nearly every day.

By Bryan Marquard

Sometimes Brooks Kelly looked at people passing by and found the seed of a painting in the way a hand moved or a head turned.

Betty Hart; helped show link between communication, child development

Dr. Hart is shown teaching at the Turner House Preschool in Kansas City, Kan., in 1967.

By William Yardley

Dr. Hart, whose research helped establish the critical role that communicating with babies and toddlers has in their later development, died Sept. 28 at age 85.

Natina Reed, 32, singer in R&B group Blaque

NATINA REED

Natina Reed, known as a member of the female group Blaque, was killed after being stuck by a car in metro Atlanta, authorities said.

Sports

Jeff Green bears heart surgery scar proudly

By Shira Springer

Green, out last year with the surgery, is silencing critics who thought the Celtics were foolish to re-sign him to a $36 million-dollar deal.

Patriots 45, Rams 7

Patriots destroy Rams in London

Rob Gronkowski put on a show after his first TD catch — he pretended to march like a Buckingham Palace guard, then got off his traditional spike.

By Shalise Manza Young

New England scored on its first six drives (five touchdowns and a field goal) and pitched a shutout for three-plus quarters for a 45-7 win.

Christopher L. Gasper

Despite win, Patriots still searching for identity

Tom Brady and the Patriots took a 5-3 record in the bye after Sunday’s win.

By Christopher L. Gasper

Sherlock Holmes would have a tough time figuring out this year’s Patriots, who reached the halfway mark at 5-3.

G: Health

G Cover

Living with back pain

Michael Gershman works out at the Spaulding Outpatient Center in Medford, where back patients participate in education seminars, therapy sessions, and exercise classes.

By Deborah Kotz

Most treatments from painkillers to physical therapy to surgery aren’t permanent solutions for the pain, which has led to a rise in rehabilitation programs.

Ex-Bangle Susanna Hoffs dips into sounds of her past

“I was inundated with melodies,’’ Susanna Hoffs says of growing up in the 1960s. It’s reflected on her new solo CD, “Someday.’’

By James Reed

Hoffs will play a rare solo show at the Center for Arts in Natick in support of her new solo album, “Someday,” which is influenced by the melodies of 1960s pop music.

Lindi Ortega’s country keeps its borders open

“My music is outlaw and traditional country, with little speckles and spatterings of blues and soul and folk and roots and rock,’’ says Lindi Ortega.

By Stuart Munro

Ortega, who comes to the House of Blues on Tuesday, is typically categorized as alternative country, a description she thinks is as close as anything.

More Stories

Music Review

New adventures with Smashing Pumpkins

By Scott McLennan

Music Review

Jackiw-Zander reunion a high note

By Jeremy Eichler

MD Mama

What parents need to know about organic food

By Dr. Claire McCarthy

Health answers: What is anaphylaxis?

By Courtney Humphries

Daily Dose

Do puppies learn to catch contagious yawns?

By Deborah Kotz

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Monday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Sarah Rodman

Chess Notes

Weekly chess column

By Harold Dondis and Patrick Wolff

Names

Artists the lifeblood of ‘Everything That Creeps’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Revelers gather at State Room for Silk Road Gala

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

BJFF honors three at ‘Bedazzled’ party

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Ben Mezrich and his wife spotted in costume

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Casting news for Boston TV show ‘Terminales’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Chris Evans joins celebs at LACMA gala

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein