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Sandy slams Mass., hundreds of thousands lose power

Waves crashed over homes on Turner Road in Scituate on Monday. Even though the landfall was in New Jersey, Massachusetts took a pounding from one of the biggest storms in history.

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

One of the largest storms ever to hit the East Coast pummeled Massachusetts on Monday with punishing winds and dangerously high seas.

Poll shows Warren, Brown deadlocked with week to go

A new Boston Globe poll shows that the race between Senator Scott Brown and Elizabeth Warren is essentially tied.

Sandy shakes up presidential campaign strategies

The hurricane prompted President Obama and Mitt Romney to cancel rallies and raised questions about the effect of the storm on voting.

US Route 30, a major approach to Atlantic City, was covered with water from Absecon Bay on Monday because of Hurricane Sandy’s approach.

Tom Mihalek/REUTERS

Hurricane’s wide reach causes havoc for millions

Sandy battered the Atlantic Coast, knocking down power lines and leaving hundreds of thousands of people — including a large swath of Manhattan — in the dark.

The Nation

Sandy shakes up presidential campaign strategies

Mitt Romney boarded his campaign plane in Moline, Ill., Monday. President Obama returned to Washington D.C. Monday tomonitor emergency response to Hurricane Sandy.

By Brian MacQuarrie

The hurricane prompted President Obama and Mitt Romney to cancel rallies and raised questions about the effect of the storm on voting.

Storms of past help Scituate cope with Sandy

Waves crashed near a lighthouse in Scituate on Monday afternoon.

By Akilah Johnson

Some fears of town officials came to pass when winds felled trees — and, with them, power lines, causing darkness to descend over some neighborhoods.

High court hears challenge to surveillance law

Solicitor General Donald Verrilli said opponents should not be allowed to sue.

By Jesse J. Holland

Supreme Court justices appeared skeptical of a government request to block a lawsuit challenging expansion of a 1978 surveillance law.

The World

Failed Syrian cease-fire ends; death toll tops 500

The state news agency showed footage of car-bomb damage in Jaramana, a suburb of Damascus. It said 11 people died.

By Ben Hubbard

Syrian jets unleashed what opponents called the widest one-day bombing since the uprising began.

Israel arrests Hamas activists in West Bank

Israel’s intelligence service has arrested dozens of Hamas members in the West Bank who had been setting up infrastructure for the militant Islamic group there, according to a statement.

Turkish police use tear gas against demonstration

Young women shouting slogans were among the thousands who marched Monday to the mausoleum of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk in Ankara to celebrate Turkey’s Republic Day.

Monday’s march to mark the founding of the Turkish republic went on despite the police’s use of tear gas and water cannons against tens of thousands of pro-secular protesters.

Editorial & Opinion

juliette kayyem

Hurricane solidarity won’t last long

By Juliette Kayyem

The nation, and political parties, seemed to come together in the response to Sandy, but that detente is likely to be fleeting.

Farah stockman

Pakistan’s industry of denial

By Farah Stockman

One reason Pakistan hasn’t made more progress in its fight against extremism is its habit of denying that such homegrown extremism exists.

paul mcmorrow

Jamaica Plain subjects real estate development to identity politics

By Paul McMorrow

A handful of housing developers are getting worked over because they won’t live up to a false, idealized notion of class and ethnic identity in Jamaica Plain.

Metro

Sandy slams Mass., hundreds of thousands lose power

Waves crashed over homes on Turner Road in Scituate on Monday. Even though the landfall was in New Jersey, Massachusetts took a pounding from one of the biggest storms in history.

By Peter Schworm, Martin Finucane and Melanie Dostis

One of the largest storms ever to hit the East Coast pummeled Massachusetts on Monday with punishing winds and dangerously high seas.

Kevin Cullen

St. Frances in Scituate weathers the storm

By Kevin Cullen

Scituate residents survive storms with a mix of hardy defiance and deep spirituality, and nowhere is that attitude more resplendent than in the sanctuary that is St. Frances.

Patrice Tierney got funds from brother in ’90s

US Representative John F. Tierney’s campaign has been hurt by the gambling case of the family of his wife, Patrice.

By Michael Rezendes

Financial ties date back to the early 1990s in the relationship of US Rep. John F. Tierney, his wife, and her now-fugitive brother, records show.

Business

CleanHarbors to buy oil recycler for $1.25b

By Beth Healy

Environmental services company Clean Harbors Inc. said it has agreed to acquire Safety-Kleen Inc., an oil recycler to the likes of NASCAR, for $1.25 billion.

Drug-mix industry stymies regulators

Seeking new rules, US Representative Edward Markey calls the meningitis outbreak “the tip of an industry iceberg.”

By Robert Weisman and Bobby Caina Calvan

There have been a series of attempts at the federal level to rein in a business that has largely evaded the kind of stringent oversight established drug makers face.

Travelers eye storm and await flights, trains, buses

 Esther Owolabi sat stranded at Logan Airport. She flew to Boston to take a bus to Washington, which leaves Tuesday.

By Katie Johnston

Travel ground to a halt in New England Monday, and cancellations and delays were expected Tuesday as Sandy’s effect continued to be felt.

Obituaries

Gudmund Vigtel, 87; transformed Atlanta’s High Museum of Art

Mr. Vigtel led the museum’s move to an architectural statement of a building designed by Richard Meier.

By Paul Vitello

Mr. Vigtel led the museum’s move to an architectural statement of a building designed by Richard Meier.

Betty Anne McCaskill, 84; mother of senator

Mrs. McCaskill (right, with Senator Claire McCaskill) aided her daughter’s campaigns.

The mother of Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill, and the first woman elected to the Columbia, Mo., City Council, has died.

Roscoe Gorham, 76; managed popular Roxbury club, aided musical acts

ROSCOE GORHAM

By Steve Morse

Roscoe Gorham, who ran the popular Roxbury club Roscoe’s Lounge, where members of New Kids on the Block played, died of prostate cancer Oct. 23.

Sports

Celtics season preview

Rajon Rondo now among Celtics greats

As he enters his seventh season, Rondo is drawing praise from some of his predecessors as perhaps the greatest point guard in Celtics history.

By Bob Hohler

Rondo is drawing praise from some of his predecessors as perhaps the greatest point guard in Celtics history.

On Basketball

For Celtics and Ray Allen, moving on was best

Ray Allen traded in his Celtics uniform for a Heat jersey in the offseason.

By Gary Washburn

It’s still strange to see Allen talk about his transition so easily, but as the hurt feelings on both sides show, the relationship had run its course.

Buster Posey critical to success of Giants

Buster Posey appreciates his second Series title in three years because “I understand the difficulty of doing it.”

By Peter Abraham

The Giants catcher drove in nine runs in 16 postseason games and handled a pitching staff that had a 2.88 earned run average.

G: Living

G Cover

Looking at the way men think

Anthony D’Aries teaching his literacy class at the South Bay House of Correction. D’Aries this year published a memoir, “The Language of Men,” and with his father and these men he looks at their representation of manhood.

By James Sullivan

In a prison classroom, author Anthony D’Aries finds masculine barriers to communication similar to those with his father, which he chronicles in his memoir “The Language of Men.”

Frame by Frame

Making ordered work out of lifelike wildness

By Sebastian Smee

“Second Time Painting” is one of a series of three witty, brazen works Robert Rauschenberg made in 1961.

Graffiti artists take party above ground

Greg Maxim-Burdett (left) and Josh Falk of Project SF (for Super Friends) at Thomas Young Studio in South Boston.

By Liza Weisstuch

Josh Falk and Greg Maxim-Burdett have assembled a show for the unveiling of a new studio space for their collective called Project SF, short for Super Friends.

More Stories

Book Reviews

In the woods, on the sea, being manly — maybe

By Ethan Gilsdorf

Album Review | Rock

Neil Young’s new journey through the past

By James Reed

Album Review | HOLIDAY

Tracey Thorn, ‘Tinsel and Lights’

By Sarah Rodman

Album Review | HIP-HOP

Meek Mill, ‘Dreams & Nightmares’

By Ken Capobianco

Album Review | HOLIDAY

Cee Lo Green, ‘Cee Lo’s Magic Moment’

By Marc Hirsh

Album Review | ELECTRONIC

Andy Stott, ‘Luxury Problems’

By Michael Andor Brodeur

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Tuesday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Sarah Rodman

Names

Save Venice throws a masquerade gala

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Errol Morris makes get-out-the-vote ad

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Blind Side’ mom campaigns for kids

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Shelly Dickson Carr celebrates ‘Ripped’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

BUILD Boston celebrates young entrepreneurs

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

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Boston Book Fest excites most, frustrates a few

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein