Front page

Nov. 2, 2012

Change urged for drunken driving cases

Judges in some Massachusetts courts acquit nearly all of the drunk driving defendants who waive their right to a jury trial.

Boston could be vulnerable to more severe storms

The city may have been spared the worst this time, but will it be so lucky the next? Don’t count on it, say researchers.

Mobile games Angry Birds, Bejeweled, and Fruit Ninja are free or 99 cents and have been downloaded tens of millions of time.

Apps shake up video game industry

The swift migration from costly consoles to smartphones and tablets has hit a burgeoning sector of the Mass. economy especially hard.

Earl Cok, 70, (left) and his brother Paul, 76, of Celeryville, Ohio, voted for Mitt Romney.

David Maxwell for The Boston Globe

Mitt Romney pushes hard for rural vote

Volunteers in Ohio are trying to sway independents and persuade traditional Republican allies to turn out in overwhelming numbers.

The Obama campaign targeted Ohio State students, some of whom cast early ballots.

Obama campaign targets younger voters

If four years ago the Obama campaign treated young voters as agents of change, it is now targeting them as an interest group with clear concerns.

President Obama resumed campaigning with stops in Colorado (above), Nevada, and Wisconsin, while Mitt Romney panned the president at a rally in Virginia.

Back on trail, candidates resume their salvos

President Obama blasted Mitt Romney’s proposals to repeal health care reform and lower tax rates, while Romney knocked his idea for a secretary of business Cabinet post.

The Nation

Obama campaign targets younger voters

The Obama campaign targeted Ohio State students, some of whom cast early ballots.

By Matt Viser

If four years ago the Obama campaign treated young voters as agents of change, it is now targeting them as an interest group with clear concerns.

Mitt Romney pushes hard for rural vote

Earl Cok, 70, (left) and his brother Paul, 76, of Celeryville, Ohio, voted for Mitt Romney.

By Bryan Bender

Volunteers in Ohio are trying to sway independents and persuade traditional Republican allies to turn out in overwhelming numbers.

Back on trail, candidates resume their salvos

President Obama resumed campaigning with stops in Colorado (above), Nevada, and Wisconsin, while Mitt Romney panned the president at a rally in Virginia.

By Callum Borchers

President Obama blasted Mitt Romney’s proposals to repeal health care reform and lower tax rates, while Romney knocked his idea for a secretary of business Cabinet post.

The World

China sentences man to 8 years for subversion

By Gillian Wong

A Chinese court has sentenced a democracy advocate who started several online groups and participated in political discussions.

Amsterdam to let drug cafes stay open

The city’s 220 coffee shops, where marijuana and hashish are openly sold, will remain open next year in spite of a new Dutch law.

CIA rushed operatives to help stem Libya attack

The US consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was set on fire after the attack. The US ambassador died in the initial assault.

By Greg Miller

The CIA played a more central role in the effort to fend off a nightlong siege at a US diplomatic compound in Libya than has been acknowledged publicly, US officials said Thursday.

Editorial & Opinion

SCOT LEHIGH

Medical marijuana is not a threat

By Scot Lehigh

The proposed law is carefully crafted to learn from other states’ experiences and avoid any of their mistakes.

JOAN WICKERSHAM

The choice to end a life

JING WEI FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE

By Joan Wickersham

Discussing physician-assisted suicide is almost beside the point. What matters more is the nature, and the meaning, of a death.

JOSHUA GREEN

Campaigns bet on their long games

 Obama’s camp placed a premium on building what was called a “snowflake” model.

By Joshua Green

Whether Mitt Romney’s early vote strength will carry on through next Tuesday, or whether President Obama’s operation will enable him to pull away, is the one great remaining unknown.

More Stories

letters | A DIVIDE OVER DEVELOPMENT

Opposition to projects is overwhelming

letters | THOUGHTS AS ELECTION DAY NEARS

Can’t wait to cast ballot (and defy the detractors)

letters | THOUGHTS AS ELECTION DAY NEARS

Weary of an ugly, ill-fought campaign

letters | THOUGHTS AS ELECTION DAY NEARS

A stark choice

Metro

Nov. 2, 2012

Change urged for drunken driving cases

A special counsel found that in some courts, nearly all drunken driving defendants who waive jury trials are acquitted.

By Jonathan Saltzman and Marcella Bombardieri

Judges in some Massachusetts courts acquit nearly all of the drunk driving defendants who waive their right to a jury trial.

Boston could be vulnerable to more severe storms

Researchers argue that the city and its densely developed shoreline are vulnerable to the more frequent and intense storms associated with global warming.

By Beth Daley and Eric Moskowitz

The city may have been spared the worst this time, but will it be so lucky the next? Don’t count on it, say researchers.

Brian McGrory

Diary of a powerless man

By Brian McGrory

The next time the lights go out, let’s cut power to the homes of Governor Deval Patrick and NStar head Tom May until everyone else’s has been restored.

Business

Apps shake up video game industry

Mobile games Angry Birds, Bejeweled, and Fruit Ninja are free or 99 cents and have been downloaded tens of millions of time.

By Michael B. Farrell

The swift migration from costly consoles to smartphones and tablets has hit a burgeoning sector of the Mass. economy especially hard.

Economic data show more growth under Democrats

By Beth Healy

Despite the view that the GOP is the party of economic prosperity and soaring stock markets, the opposite has historically been true.

Boston Capital

Hurricane Sandy unlikely to torment Mass. insurers

By Steven Syre

It’s too soon to draw firm conclusions about homeowner claims in the wake of Sandy, but the early evidence is encouraging.

More Stories

Obituaries

Kenneth Ryder, 88; pivotal Northeastern University president

 Kenneth Ryder, led Northeastern University for 14 years, expanding academic offerings.

By Bryan Marquard

Ryder, who spent more than 40 years at the college, expanded programs, constructed buildings, and quadrupled the endowment.

Edwin Q. White; led AP’s Saigon bureau during Vietnam War

Edwin White (2d from right) with once-or-future Saigon bureau chiefs George Esper (at typewriter), Malcolm Browne, George McArthur, and Richard Pyle (right).

By Oskar Garcia

Mr. White, 90, ‘‘embodied accuracy, dispassion, and objectivity” in his almost 40 year career with the Associated Press.

Ernie Hays, 77, organist; played for St. Louis Cardinals for 40 seasons

By Jim Salter

Mr. Hays, an organist who provided the soundtrack of Cardinals baseball for 40 years, has died, the team said Thursday.

Sports

Despite great gains, is there now a Title IX stall?

The fight for progress in women’s athletics continues — just as it does here for Harvard-Radcliffe’s Lenica Morales in a rugby match against Columbia.

By Stan Grossfeld

Harvard has added women’s rugby as a varsity sport but few colleges have followed their lead, which makes critics talk about Title IX stall.

Dan Shaughnessy

Why Boston is lucky to have the Celtics

By Dan Shaughnessy

The Celtics are part of the fabric of the city, and their home opener finally gives Boston a reason to celebrate sports.

Patriots take a chance on Aqib Talib

Aqib Talib

By Shalise Manza Young

The Patriots made a bold move trading with Tampa for the cornerback who is widely regarded as talented but who also has a history of volatility.

More Stories

Celtics notebook

Rajon Rondo downplays foul on Dwyane Wade

By Gary Washburn

PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK

Ryan Wendell gets vote of confidence

By Shalise Manza Young

Sports media

NBC putting its faith in soccer

By Chad Finn

College hockey notebook

Merrimack hockey a work in progress

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell

High School Football Advance

Bridgewater-Raynham hosts Barnstable in showdown

By Andy Deossa

school roundup

Roundup: Latin Academy wins volleyball title

By Andy Deossa

East Boston 1, Latin Academy 0

East Boston tops Latin Academy in city girls’ soccer championship

By Mary Pavlu

Downs & Distance

Maryland turns QB duties to freshman LB

By Jim McBride

The Bettor’s edge

In NFL a bad team can cover as well as a good one

By Ed Ryan

Chargers 31, Chiefs 13

Chargers rout hapless Chiefs

By Bernie Wilson

national college football

Alabama ready for big test at LSU

G: Arts & Movies

music

Boston to experience Human Sexual Response again

A still from the DVD “Unba Unba.”

By Matt Parish

The wild, seven-piece freakshow of Human Sexual Response was a central act in Boston’s late-’70s rock underground. On Nov. 10, Boston gets another chance to live their unique mayhem.

MOVIE REVIEW

‘Flight’ shows why Denzel Washington is a true star

Denzel Washington plays an alcoholic pilot who is a hero after he makes an emergency landing of a passenger airplane.

By Wesley Morris

You know what’s still worth $15 plus the cost of a baby sitter, popcorn, and parking? Two hours with Washington at the height of his everything.

MOVIE REVIEW

‘Holy Motors’ is a weird, wild drive

Eva Mendes and Denis Lavant.

By Wesley Morris

It’s an automotive picaresque with Denis Lavant as a gentleman who emerges from his limousine a different person every time.

More Stories

MOVIE REVIEW

‘Loneliest Planet’ a journey worth taking

By Wesley Morris

MOVIE REVIEW

‘The Details’ has no surprises

By Mark Feeney

Book Review

‘Thornton Wilder: A Life’ by Penelope Niven

By Patti Hartigan

Noisy Neighbors

Creaturos, ‘Swampp Thingg’

By Matt Parish

Night Watch

Freak Flag Fridays at Moe’s Lounge

By Andrew Doerfler

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

BONUS TRACKS

By Matt Parish