Front page

Obama seeks the seeds of solutions

President Obama, his wife, Michelle, and daughters Sasha and Malia headed to Air Force One in Chicago on Wednesday.

Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press

The war in Afghanistan has not ended. Iran remains a threat. The economy is still struggling. The federal debt still exists. And bitter divisions continue.

GOP hints of dealing to avert fiscal cliff

Within weeks, Congress must take action to avoid the “fiscal cliff” of huge spending hikes and tax increase. At the same time, it must figure out what to do with expiring Bush-era tax cuts, which President Obama wants to end for the wealthiest Americans. The conversation began Wednesday as

Mass. pharmacy board chief fired after meningitis outbreak

James D. Coffey has been fired for allegedly ignoring a complaint in July about the Framingham compounding pharmacy at the center of the meningitis outbreak.

Women’s electoral might grows in New Hampshire, US

The state’s election of the nation’s first all-female congressional delegation was the most dramatic example of a phenomenon that swept the country.

Menino’s machine boosted Warren

Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s get-out-the-vote expertise cranked out the largest turnout in Boston since 1964.

Arn Chorn-Pond at a photo exhibit of Cambodian war refugees at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse.

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Cambodian brings story of genocide to younger audience

A thinly fictionalized biography of Arn Chorn-Pond and his escape from Cambodia’s Killing Fields is a finalist for this year’s National Book Awards.

The Nation

Obama seeks the seeds of solutions

President Obama, his wife, Michelle, and daughters Sasha and Malia headed to Air Force One in Chicago on Wednesday.

By Brian MacQuarrie

The war in Afghanistan has not ended. Iran remains a threat. The economy is still struggling. The federal debt still exists. And bitter divisions continue.

GOP hints of dealing to avert fiscal cliff

By Bobby Caina Calvan and Michael Kranish

House Speaker John Boehner offered the president a faint framework of a deal to avoid a “fiscal cliff,” suggesting Republicans could accept “new revenue.”

Nor’easter slams N.Y. and N.J. areas hit by Sandy

Snow fell in the New Dorp section of Staten Island, a neighborhood still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Sandy.

By James Barron

The storm delivered more wind, water, and misery to places where frustration from Hurricane Sandy had yet to recede.

The World

Britain calls for stronger action on Syria

By David Stringer and Elizabeth A. Kennedy

Britain called on the US and other allies Wednesday to do more to shape the Syrian opposition into a coherent force.

23 saved, 50 missing in Bangladesh boat accident

Nearby fishing boats helped rescue 23 people after a boat crowded with illegal migrants capsized off Bangladesh’s coast, but about 50 others remained missing, officials said.

Yemen security official assassinated

By Ahmed Al-Haj

A Yemeni intelligence officer was assassinated in a drive-by shooting by unidentified gunmen in the capital in the latest attack against security forces in the country.

Editorial & Opinion

Juliette Kayyem

Obama has a mandate — immigration reform

By Juliette Kayyem

Hope did not win this election for Barack Obama. Demographics did, notably the Hispanic vote.

joan vennochi

How Brown lost support from women

By Joan Vennochi

By insulting Elizabeth Warren, Scott Brown insulted every woman who had to scratch and fight to prove her worth.

Opinion | nicholas burns

Three crises that can’t wait

The plight of a homeless man in Camden, N.J., highlights the state of the economy.

By Nicholas Burns

The economy, Afghanistan, and the Middle East will need President Obama’s focus as he looks at his second term.

Metro

Menino’s machine boosted Warren

Anthony Albano, a veteran Menino volunteer, worked for Elizabeth Warren in East Boston.

By Andrew Ryan

Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s get-out-the-vote expertise cranked out the largest turnout in Boston since 1964.

Mass. pharmacy board chief fired after meningitis outbreak

By Kay Lazar

James D. Coffey has been fired for allegedly ignoring a complaint in July about the Framingham compounding pharmacy at the center of the meningitis outbreak.

Yvonne Abraham

Expensive lessons of 2012

By Yvonne Abraham

Even if your cause or candidate tanked, the obscene, untold billions spent assaulting voters’ senses yielded generous helpings of the absurd.

Business

Tech Lab

Newest Nook may be a better option than iPad mini

The iPad mini (left) and Nook HD tablets.

By Hiawatha Bray

The iPad mini is smaller, lighter, thinner, and just as useful as its big brother. But it starts at $329. For $199, Barnes & Noble offers an ­appealing fallback.

Boston’s financial sector braces for second Obama term

By Todd Wallack

Hopes have been dashed that a new president and Congress would rewrite the Dodd-Frank law or eliminate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Massachusetts defense contractors brace for cuts

Defense contractors like missile maker Raytheon employ more than 130,000 people in Massachusetts.

By Michael B. Farrell

President Obama’s second term will almost certainly mean deep cuts in military spending that could lead to job losses in the state’s multibillion dollar defense sector.

Obituaries

John Cheffers; BU professor studied sports fans’ behavior

John Cheffers

By J.M. Lawrence

An authority on crowd behavior, Dr. Cheffers, 76, studied why sports fans wave giant foam fingers and sometimes angrily pelt players with cups.

Carmen Basilio, 85; boxer defeated Sugar Ray Robinson

Mr. Basilio celebrated after he knocked out Tony DeMarco at the Boston Garden in 1955.

By Richard Goldstein

Carmen Basilio was a welterweight and middleweight boxing champion of the 1950s who fought two brutal bouts with Sugar Ray Robinson.

Sports

Celtics 100, Wizards 94 (OT)

Sloppy Celtics need OT to get past Wizards

Forward Brandon Bass put the Celtics over the top, 97-92, with a dunk with 37 seconds left in overtime.

By Frank Dell'Apa

The Celtics struggled through most of regulation, but got their act together in time to even their record at 2-2.

Dan Shaughnessy

Why Tommy Heinsohn is a Celtics institution

Tommy Heinsohn is seen coaching the Celtics during the NBA Finals against the Bucks in 1974.

By Dan Shaughnessy

The Celtics’ color commentator was one of the greatest players and coaches in team history, a fact many young fans may miss because of his colorful TV personality.

BC’s Erik Johnson is coaching through the grief

Erik Johnson, a former BC women’s basketball assistant who is back now as the head coach, lost his son at age 4 to an undiagnosed birth defect in May 2010.

By Amalie Benjamin

Johnson, the new coach of BC’s women’s basketball team, lost his 4-year-old son two years ago. As he tries to rebuild the program, the pain still overwhelms him some days.

G: Style

Clinton Sparks moves into the spotlight

Clinton Sparks produces some of the biggest stars in music. Now the Dorchester native is doing his own tracks, and that’s not all.

By Rachel Zarrell

Although you might not have heard of Clinton Sparks, odds are you’ve come in contact with his music.

Cambodian brings story of genocide to younger audience

Arn Chorn-Pond at a photo exhibit of Cambodian war refugees at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse.

By Joseph P. Kahn

A thinly fictionalized biography of Arn Chorn-Pond and his escape from Cambodia’s Killing Fields is a finalist for this year’s National Book Awards.

5 tracks to download from Clinton Sparks

Dorchester native Clinton Sparks first made his reputation as a DJ and, later, as a producer for some of the biggest names in music. Here are five hits that have Sparks all over them.

More Stories

Bargain Bin

Let the holiday sales begin

By Ami Albernaz

Ask Martha

Feel-good things to do this November

By Martha Stewart

Book Review

‘The Mortal Sea’ by W. Jeffrey Bolster

By Michael Kenney

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

events

Upcoming nightlife events around Boston

By Milva DiDomizio

events

Boston-area events

By June Wulff

Critic’s corner: Nov. 8

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Names

Ken Oringer, others fix a feast for hurricane benefit

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Berklee band entertains a disappointed Romney crowd

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Maria Menounos gets ‘Quinnterviewed’ at Emerson

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Big Bird spared, for now

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Colby O’Donis celebrates with BELL

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Celtics star Rajon Rondo surprises students

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Antoine Walker to appear at CURE Lounge

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Leon and Dante de Magistris (not) on ‘Anderson Cooper Live’

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

What’s cool? Usually it’s a group decision

Jonathan Gerber, standing near Frost Hall, is an assistant professor of psychology at Gordon College in Wenham.

By David Rattigan

Jonathan Gerber, an assistant professor at Gordon College in Wenham, recently set out to measure what makes things cool in localized social networks.

Winthrop

Long-awaited Winthrop Beach restoration underway

Officials say early work to rebuild Winthrop Beach has already paid off, lessening damage when Hurricane Sandy sent waves crashing into the shoreline last week.

By John Laidler

State contractors have begun the estimated $17 million project, which calls for renourishing the badly eroded shoreline with 450,000 cubic yards of added sand and gravel.

Lowell, Billerica

MBTA stops vendor from selling commuter rail tickets

The lawyer representing Mill City Tickets’ owner said his client hopes to resume selling tickets at Gallagher Terminal and other MBTA commuter rail stations.

By Brenda J. Buote

The MBTA ended its relationship with Mill City Tickets, a vendor for the Lowell and North Billerica commuter rail stations after the company failed to follow the T’s policies.

Globe South

Gardens to be dedicated to fallen servicemen

Kevin Donovan, CEO of the Tri-Town Development Corp., led efforts to place memorial gardens in the development.

By Michele Morgan Bolton

The lives of three young men from Rockland and Weymouth who were inspired by post-9/11 patriotism to serve their country will be celebrated Saturday on the eve of Veterans Day.

One of the Gardnes for U.S. Marine Sergeant Andrew K. Farrar Jr.

The three servicemen killed in Iraq lived in Weymouth and Rockland.

Iraqi and Afghan wars killed 27 from the south suburbs

Service personnel from the south suburbs killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Globe West

200-mile walking trail moves closer to completion

Trustees of Reservations lifted their wheelbarrow, filled with construction supplies over the entry to the Noon Hill trail  in Medfield.

By Jennette Barnes

The Bay Circuit Trail, a generations-old vision of connected recreational walking paths, is nearly complete.

Completing the Bay Circuit Trail

The Bay Circuit Trail

The 200-mile-long Bay Circuit Trail is almost complete, but several gaps remain.

Food pantries struggle to meet demand

The economy has caused greater need for local food pantries.

By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts

A sharp increase families lining up for food has caused the United Way of Tri-County to launch a new fund-raising campaign in order to keep up.