Front page

3,300 gas leaks are found in Boston

A new study underscores the explosion risk and environmental damage from aging infrastructure under city sidewalks and streets.

Middlesex District Attorney Gerard T. Leone Jr. is considering whether to appeal Judge Kathe M. Tuttman’s decision in the case of Ben Peirce, now 17, who is charged in the 2010 slaying of 29-year-old Adam Coveney.

Mass. seeks new policy on life sentences

The state has to be brought into compliance with new federal law outlawing mandatory juvenile life without parole for murder.

Heidi Cron downloaded “Downton Abbey” before it aired in the United States.

EVAN MCGLINN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE

TV spoilers are becoming unavoidable

The obsession with sharing everything we know on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites means that what happens on TV doesn’t stay on TV.

President Obama exchanged formalities with Prime Minister Hun Sen and his wife, Bun Rany, Monday in Phnom Penh, where he pressed the longtime ruler to release political prisoners, stop land seizures, and hold free and fair elections. Aides said Obama would have stayed away from Cambodia if it were not hosting regional summits.

Apichart Weerawong/AP

President Obama hits Cambodia on rights

Obama became the first sitting US president to visit Cambodia, criticizing the country’s autocratic leader on human rights issues.

In this Oct. 13 photo, Mayor Thomas M. Menino, right, strategized with local union leaders.

Hospital room is now Mayor Menino’s office

For the past 25 days, the mayor has been working from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he is being treated for a ­variety of ailments.

Chicken is on St. Anthony Shrine’s holiday menu.

Turkey price has pantries parting with custom

Higher prices and growing demand have forced more charity groups to hand out chickens instead of turkeys to struggling families.

The Nation

Red-state Democrats may defect on budget plan

 Kay Hagan of North Carolina isn’t ruling out support for extending the George W. Bushera tax cuts for top earners.

By Kathleen Hunter

Senate Democrats may have to contend with wariness from seven members who face reelection in states Mitt Romney won.

California judge denies bid for park Nativity displays

A federal judge ruled Monday against churches who had sued to keep the tradition alive amidst a takeover by atheists.

Ancient rock carvings stolen in Sierra Nevada

At least four petroglyphs — some 2 feet wide and located 15 feet above the ground — were hacked from lava cliffs in the Eastern Sierra.

The World

Hamas chief scoffs at Israel’s ground invasion threat

Palestinians gathered around a destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip Monday.

By Alan Cowell and Fares Akram

Hamas dared Israel to invade as the Israeli military countered Gazan rockets with a new wave of deadly airstrikes.

Congo rebels, army clash at Goma’s edge

Rebels believed to be backed by Rwanda fired mortars and machine guns Monday, threatening to capture one of the largest cities in eastern Congo.

Colombian rebels announce cease-fire

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2012 file photo, Ivan Marquez, chief negotiator of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, answers questions at a press conference at the headquarters of the Cuban agency Prensa Latina in Havana, Cuba. The two chief negotiators didn't shake hands or look at one another as talks to end Colombia's stubborn five-decade-old conflict were inaugurated in Norway last month. On Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, Marquez, a rebel former seminarian and Humberto de la Calle, a sage veteran of Colombian politics, sit down to negotiate in earnest in Havana. (AP Photo/Jorge Perez, Prensa Latina, File)

Ivan Marquez said the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia would stop all military operations against government and private property until Jan. 20.

Editorial & Opinion

Farah Stockman

Baby, please don’t go

By Farah Stockman

Talk of secession could be a sign of irreconcilable differences in our relationship to the federal government.

Joanna Weiss

Organizing a real Dumbledore’s Army

By Joanna Weiss

Fans of the Harry Potter novels are finding they can channel that enthusiasm into addressing problems in the real world.

Paul McMorrow

Housing as a math problem

By Paul McMorrow

The approach most cities and towns in Mass. have taken toward building housing chases young, talented workers out of the state.

Metro

3,300 gas leaks are found in Boston

By Beth Daley

A new study underscores the explosion risk and environmental damage from aging infrastructure under city sidewalks and streets.

Hospital room is now Mayor Menino’s office

In this Oct. 13 photo, Mayor Thomas M. Menino, right, strategized with local union leaders.

By Andrew Ryan

For the past 25 days, the mayor has been working from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he is being treated for a ­variety of ailments.

Mass. seeks new policy on life sentences

Middlesex District Attorney Gerard T. Leone Jr. is considering whether to appeal Judge Kathe M. Tuttman’s decision in the case of Ben Peirce, now 17, who is charged in the 2010 slaying of 29-year-old Adam Coveney.

By Maggie Mulvihill

The state has to be brought into compliance with new federal law outlawing mandatory juvenile life without parole for murder.

Business

Kremlin critics ask West to stop ads on biased TV

Vladimir Putin returned to the presidency of Russia in May of this year.

By Mansur Mirovalev

Russian opposition and human rights groups urged Western consumer products giants to stop advertising on a Kremlin-friendly TV network.

Mass. borrowers get $266m in aid

By Jenifer B. McKim

Nearly 4,000 Mass. borrowers have received some kind of housing-debt relief this year as part of a national mortgage settlement involving five major lenders.

NYC jumps ahead of Boston in tech start-ups

New York (above) has elbowed out Boston as the premier East Coast locale for young digital entrepreneurs.

By Michael B. Farrell

New York ranked fourth, ahead of Boston, in a new study rating regions around the world based on the amount of start-up activity this year.

Obituaries

Seth P. Tillman, 82, key Fulbright foreign policy aide

By Emily Langer

Mr. Tillman helped shape late Senator J. William Fulbright’s powerfully influential opposition to the Vietnam War.

Thomas W. Wolfe, 93, former Treasury official

THOMAS W. WOLFE

By Neil Irwin

Wolfe, a Treasury Department official, managed the United States’ move off the gold standard and its economic consequences.

1960s, ’70s hit R&B singer Billy Scott, 70, dies in N.C.

With his wife Barbara, he formed The Prophets and recorded “I Got the Fever.” Other hits included ­‘‘California’’ and ‘‘Seaside Love’’ as the Georgia Prophets.

Sports

What happens now with Rob Gronkowski out?

The broken left forearm of Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski isn’t expected to keep him out for the season.

By Shalise Manza Young

Aaron Hernandez and Visanthe Shiancoe may attempt to fill in, but the truth is likely that no one can replace Gronkowski’s production.

Dan Shaughnessy

Why are Patriots mum on Gronkowski injury?

Rob Gronkowski will likely be out for several weeks with a broken forearm.

By Dan Shaughnessy

It’s not like the Jets are game-planning for the tight end to play on Thursday night, so why do fans accept Bill Belichick’s refusal to discuss issues like this?

‘Great’ Red Sox team is planned, but for when?

Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington has the team ahead of where it was at this time last offseason.

By Peter Abraham

“We hope it’s 2013,” GM Ben Cherington said of his plans for a Red Sox revival. But rebuilding this team could take longer.

G: Living

G Cover

Taking a break from beauty

Phoebe Baker Hyde’s book “The Beauty Experiment” will be published Dec. 25.

By Linda Matchan

Phoebe Baker Hyde spent a year away from makeup and fashion and came away with a book — and a better sense of herself.

Tips on how to keep from stressing about beauty

By Linda Matchan

Author Phoebe Baker Hyde shares a few lessons she learned from her year of forgoing the glam.

Television review

‘American Masters’ profiles mogul David Geffen

David Geffen, circa 1972, is the subject of an “American Masters” documentary. He founded Asylum Records with Elliot Roberts in 1970 and in 1972 sold it to Warner Communications.

By Matthew Gilbert

“Inventing David Geffen,” a new installment of the PBS series, is an effort to show how influential Geffen’s ability to recognize talent has been.

More Stories

Album Review | POP

Rihanna takes aim at critics on ‘Unapologetic’

By James Reed

Album Review | HIP-HOP

Pitbull, ‘Global Warming’

By Ken Capobianco

Album Review | ROCK

Kid Rock, ‘Rebel Soul’

By Sarah Rodman

Book Review

‘Elsewhere’ by Richard Russo

By Jay Atkinson

Events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Tuesday Night Television

Critic’s corner: What’s on TV tonight

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Names

Tom Brady gifts slippers to his teammates

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Mark Wahlberg gets into the docu-series biz

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Berklee hitmakers at the American Music Awards

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Grub Street has a ‘Joyride’ in Brookline

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Denis Leary raises money for Cam Neely Foundation

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

A celebration of farms and Lovin’ Spoonfuls

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Car Talk’ will air on SiriusXM Public Radio

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

MUSIC REVIEW

BSO Chamber Players celebrate the late Elliott Carter

By Matthew Guerrieri